See also: irònic

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French ironique, from Late Latin ironicus

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /aɪˈɹɒn.ɪk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒnɪk

AdjectiveEdit

ironic (comparative more ironic, superlative most ironic)

  1. Characterized by or constituting (any kind of) irony.
    • 2014, Steven Pinker, The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century!, p.275
      It was ironic I forgot my textbook on human memory.
  2. Given to the use of irony; sarcastic.
  3. Contrary or opposite to what may be expected.
    It's ironic to have a blizzard in the middle of the summer.
  4. (proscribed) Odd or coincidental; strange.
    It's ironic that we are eating a sandwich in Sandwich, Massachusetts.

Usage notesEdit

Some writers complain about an overuse of the word ironic to extend to situations which are remarkable for reasons other than irony - perhaps just coincidental or merely odd.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ironicus through French ironique

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ironic m or n (feminine singular ironică, masculine plural ironici, feminine and neuter plural ironice)

  1. ironic

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit