EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Originated 1250–1300 from Middle English being; see be + -ing.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈbiːɪŋ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈbiɪŋ/, /ˈbiŋ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːɪŋ, -ɪŋ
  • Hyphenation: be‧ing

VerbEdit

being

  1. present participle of be

NounEdit

being (countable and uncountable, plural beings)

  1. A living creature.
    • 1887, H. Rider Haggard, She: A History of Adventure, page 126:
      Minute grew into minute, and still there was no sign of life, nor did the curtain move; but I felt the gaze of the unknown being sinking through and through me, and filling me with a nameless terror, till the perspiration stood in beads upon my brow.
  2. The state or fact of existence, consciousness, or life, or something in such a state.
    • 1608-1634, John Webster (and perhaps Thomas Heywood), Appius and Virginia
      Claudius, thou / Wast follower of his fortunes in his being.
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
      For the service to be considered was not the service of one servant, but of two servants, and even of three servants, and even of an infinity of servants, of whom the first could not out till the second up, nor the second up till the third in, nor the third in till the first out, nor the first out till the third in, nor the third in till the second up, nor the second up till the first out, every going, every being, every coming consisting with a being and a coming, a coming and a going, a going and a being, nay with all the beings and all the comings, with all the comings and all the goings, with all the goings and all the beings, of all the servants that had ever served Mr. Knott, of all the servants that ever would serve Mr. Knott.
  3. (philosophy) That which has actuality (materially or in concept).
  4. (philosophy) One's basic nature, or the qualities thereof; essence or personality.
  5. (obsolete) An abode; a cottage.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wright to this entry?)

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ConjunctionEdit

being

  1. Given that; since.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970:
      , New York Review Books 2001, p.280:
      ’Tis a hard matter therefore to confine them, being they are so various and many […].

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Scottish GaelicEdit

NounEdit

being f (genitive singular beinge, plural beingean)

  1. bench, form