jalouse

See also: jalousé

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Scots jalouse, from Old French jalouser. The sense "to be jealous of" came about as a misunderstanding by southern writers, from the similarity to jealousy.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

jalouse (third-person singular simple present jalouses, present participle jalousing, simple past and past participle jaloused)

  1. (Scotland, transitive) To suspect.
  2. (transitive) To be jealous of.
    • 1885, Sir Richard Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night, Night 18
      When my two sisters (these two bitches, O Commander of the Faithful!) saw me by the side of my young lover they jaloused me on his account and were wroth and plotted mischief against me.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

jalouse

  1. feminine singular of jaloux

VerbEdit

jalouse

  1. first-person singular present indicative of jalouser
  2. third-person singular present indicative of jalouser
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of jalouser
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of jalouser
  5. second-person singular imperative of jalouser

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French jalouser (to be jealous of).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

jalouse (third-person singular present jalouses, present participle jalousin, past jaloused, past participle jaloused)

  1. to guess, suspect, infer, be suspicious of, to have doubts or suspicions about, surmise