Open main menu

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French suspect, from Latin suspectus, perfect passive participle of suspiciō (mistrust, suspect), from sus-, combining form of sub (under), + speciō (watch, look at).

PronunciationEdit

Adjective, noun

  • enPR: sŭsʹpĕkt, IPA(key): /ˈsʌs.pɛkt/
  • (file)

Verb

VerbEdit

suspect (third-person singular simple present suspects, present participle suspecting, simple past and past participle suspected)

  1. (transitive) To imagine or suppose (something) to be true, or to exist, without proof.
    to suspect the presence of disease
    • Milton
      From her hand I could suspect no ill.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 5, in The China Governess[1]:
      Mr. Campion appeared suitably impressed and she warmed to him. He was very easy to talk to with those long clown lines in his pale face, a natural goon, born rather too early she suspected.
    • 2013 June 7, Gary Younge, “Hypocrisy lies at heart of Manning prosecution”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 26, page 18:
      WikiLeaks did not cause these uprisings but it certainly informed them. The dispatches revealed details of corruption and kleptocracy that many Tunisians suspected, but could not prove, and would cite as they took to the streets.
  2. (transitive) To distrust or have doubts about (something or someone).
    to suspect the truth of a story
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Addison to this entry?)
  3. (transitive) To believe (someone) to be guilty.
    I suspect him of being the thief.
  4. (intransitive) To have suspicion.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To look up to; to respect.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

suspect (plural suspects)

  1. A person who is suspected of something, in particular of committing a crime.
    Round up the usual suspects.Casablanca

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

suspect (comparative more suspect, superlative most suspect)

  1. Viewed with suspicion; suspected.
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Milton:
      What I can do or offer is suspect.
    • 2013 January 1, Katie L. Burke, “Ecological Dependency”, in American Scientist[2], volume 101, number 1, page 64:
      In his first book since the 2008 essay collection Natural Acts: A Sidelong View of Science and Nature, David Quammen looks at the natural world from yet another angle: the search for the next human pandemic, what epidemiologists call “the next big one.” His quest leads him around the world to study a variety of suspect zoonoses—animal-hosted pathogens that infect humans.
    • 2019 July 24, David Austin Walsh, “Flirting With Fascism”, in Jewish Currents[3]:
      Facing a backlash over the use of the term “cosmopolitan,” [Josh] Hawley later defended himself against accusations of antisemitism on Twitter as “an ardent advocate of the state of Israel and the Jewish people.” But this conflation of the state of Israel and the Jewish people is the entire point. To today’s far right, Israel is a firm ally against Islam, while “cosmopolitans,” many of whom just happen to be Jewish, are suspect.
  2. (nonstandard) Viewing with suspicion; suspecting.
    • 2004, Will Nickell, letter to the editor of Field & Stream, Volume CIX Number 8 (December 2004–January 2005), page 18:
      Now I’m suspect of other advice that I read in your pages.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin suspectus

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

suspect (feminine singular suspecte, masculine plural suspects, feminine plural suspectes)

  1. suspicious; suspect

Usage notesEdit

  • The -ct- becomes audible in the feminine forms (as [kt]). It is one of very few adjectives in which two mute consonants reappear.

NounEdit

suspect m (plural suspects, feminine suspecte)

  1. a suspect

Further readingEdit