See also: Kadi and kádi

Contents

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

kadi ‎(plural kadis)

  1. Alternative spelling of qadi
    • 1907, Various, The Olive Fairy Book[1]:
      To this the Jew agreed, and the two went together to the great hall, in which the kadi was administering justice.
    • 1898, Rounsevelle Wildman, Tales of the Malayan Coast[2]:
      "You shall go to Mecca when you grow up, and become a Hadji, and when you come back the high kadi shall take you in the mosque and make a kateeb of you," said I. "Now put your forehead to the ground and thank the good Allah that the kuching had eaten dog before he got you."
    • 1836, Robert Huish, Lander's Travels[3]:
      Each has an imaum, but the kadi is their head, of which dignity he seems not a little proud.

Crimean TatarEdit

EtymologyEdit

Arabic (indefinite) قَاضٍ ‎(qāḍin), (definite) الْقَاضِي ‎(al-qāḍī)

NounEdit

kadi

  1. Moslem judge

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *kъdě, *kъde, from Proto-Indo-European *kwu-dhē.

AdverbEdit

kadi

  1. (Chakavian) where

PronounEdit

kadi

  1. (Chakavian) where

SynonymsEdit


SwahiliEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English card.

NounEdit

kadi (n class, plural kadi)

  1. card

TboliEdit

NounEdit

kadi

  1. (anatomy) dimple
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