EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Dutch klomp.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

klomp (plural klomps or klompen)

  1. A Dutch wooden clog.
    • 1900, William Elliot Griffis, The American in Holland:
      Elisha could have saved his ox-yokes and made a farewell feast out of his shoes, had he been a Dutchman. The cast-off klomps of Holland must, in the course of a year, form a considerable addition to the stock of fuel.

VerbEdit

klomp (third-person singular simple present klomps, present participle klomping, simple past and past participle klomped)

  1. (intransitive) To walk heavily or stomp, as though walking in clogs or wooden shoes.

AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch klomp, from Middle Dutch clompe, from Old Dutch *klumpo, from Proto-Germanic *klumpô, from Proto-Indo-European *glembʰ-.

NounEdit

klomp (plural klompe, diminutive klompie)

  1. Wooden shoe, clog.
  2. Mass, lump, chunk.

DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch clompe (lump or mass of metal, wooden shoe, clump), from Old Dutch *klumpo, from Proto-Germanic *klumpô (lump, clump, mass; clasp), from Proto-Indo-European *glembʰ- (clamp, mass). Cognate with Old Frisian klumpa, English clump, Low German Klump, German Klumpen. Related to clamp.

 
Souvenirklompjes
Souvenir clogs

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

klomp m (plural klompen, diminutive klompje n)

  1. A wooden shoe, clog.
  2. A clump, nugget, lump (an unshaped piece or mass)
  3. (field hockey) A kicker, protective footwear worn by goalkeepers.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: klomp
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: klumpu
  • Negerhollands: klomp, klump
  • English: klomp, clomp
  • Papiamentu: klòmpi, klompi, klòmp
  • Sranan Tongo: klompu