Last modified on 25 August 2014, at 11:02

komast

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek κωμαστής (kōmastēs) ‘reveler’, from κῶμος (kōmos) ‘merrymaking’.

NounEdit

komast (plural komasts)

  1. A drunken reveller, especially as depicted in ancient Greek art.
    • 1979, The triple repetition of the god's name has a hymnic effect and so in form as well as function these lines are a modification of the standard appeal of the komast to a divinity for help. — David West & Tony Woodman, Creative Imitation and Latin Literature (Cambridge University Press 2001, p. 55)
    • 1994, In later versions of this theme on vases, a komast is occasionally found instead of the protosatyr here. — Eric Csapo & Judith Barringer, The Context of Ancient Drama (University of Michigan Press 2005, p. 96)

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the verb koma (to come) + -st (a suffix which turns verbs into middle voice verbs). See also the appendix about the Icelandic middle voice verbs.

VerbEdit

komast

  1. to get there, to get, to be able to come
    Hún komst alla leið þótt hún væri fótbrotin.
    She got to the end despite her broken leg.
    Nei fyrirgefðu, ég kemst ekki.
    I'm sorry, I can't make it.

Derived termsEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

VerbEdit

komast

  1. passive infinitive of koma and kome