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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɑːt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɑɹt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)t
  • Hyphenation: art

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English art, from Old French art, from Latin artem, accusative of ars (art). Displaced native Middle English liste (art) (from Old English list).

NounEdit

 
A painting showing many kinds of art, including literature, music, and painting itself.

art (countable and uncountable, plural arts)

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  1. (uncountable) The conscious production or arrangement of sounds, colours, forms, movements, or other elements in a manner that affects the senses and emotions, usually specifically the production of the beautiful in a graphic or plastic medium.
    • 1992 May 3, "Comrade Bingo" Jeeves and Wooster, Series 3, Episode 6:
      B.W. Wooster: If you ask me, art is responsible for most of the trouble in the world.
      R. Jeeves: An interesting theory, sir. Would you care to expatiate upon it?
      B.W. Wooster: As a matter of fact, no, Jeeves. The thought just occurred to me, as thoughts do.
      R. Jeeves: Very good, sir.
    • 2005 July, Lynn Freed, Harper's:
      "I tell her what Donald Hall says: that the problem with workshops is that they trivialize art by minimizing the terror."
    • 2009, Alexander Brouwer:
      Visual art is a subjective understanding or perception of the viewer as well as a deliberate/conscious arrangement or creation of elements like colours, forms, movements, sounds, objects or other elements that produce a graphic or plastic whole that expresses thoughts, ideas or visions of the artist.
    There is a debate as to whether graffiti is art or vandalism.
  2. (countable) Skillful creative activity, usually with an aesthetic focus.
    She's mastered the art of programming.
  3. (uncountable) The study and the product of these processes.
    He's at university to study art.
  4. (uncountable) Aesthetic value.
    Her photographs are nice, but there's no art in them.
  5. (uncountable) Artwork.
    Sotherby's regularly auctions art for millions.
  6. (countable) A field or category of art, such as painting, sculpture, music, ballet, or literature.
    I'm a great supporter of the arts.
  7. (countable) A nonscientific branch of learning; one of the liberal arts.
    • 2013 August 3, “Boundary problems”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8847:
      Economics is a messy discipline: too fluid to be a science, too rigorous to be an art. Perhaps it is fitting that economists’ most-used metric, gross domestic product (GDP), is a tangle too. GDP measures the total value of output in an economic territory. Its apparent simplicity explains why it is scrutinised down to tenths of a percentage point every month.
  8. (countable) Skill that is attained by study, practice, or observation.
    • 1796, Matthew Lewis, The Monk, Folio Society 1985, page 217:
      A physician was immediately sent for; but on the first moment of beholding the corpse, he declared that Elvira's recovery was beyond the power of art.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 4, in The Celebrity:
      The Celebrity, by arts unknown, induced Mrs. Judge Short and two other ladies to call at Mohair on an afternoon when Mr. Cooke was trying a trotter on the track. The three returned wondering and charmed with Mrs. Cooke; they were sure she had had no hand in the furnishing of that atrocious house.
  9. (uncountable, dated) Contrivance, scheming, manipulation.
    • 1847, Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights:
      ...and Mrs. Earnshaw undertook to keep her sister-in-law in due restraint when she returned home; employing art, not force: with force she would have found it impossible.
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
  • Pages starting with "art".
  • DescendantsEdit
    TranslationsEdit
    The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

    Etymology 2Edit

    From Middle English art, from Old English eart ((thou) art), second-person singular present indicative of wesan, from Proto-Germanic *ar-t ((thou) art", originally, "(thou) becamest), second-person singular preterite indicative form of *iraną (to rise, be quick, become active), from Proto-Indo-European *er-, *or(w)- (to lift, rise, set in motion). Cognate with Faroese ert (art), Icelandic ert (art), Old English earon (are), from the same preterite-present Germanic verb. More at are.

    VerbEdit

    art

    1. (archaic) second-person singular simple present form of be
      How great thou art!

    See alsoEdit

    ReferencesEdit

    Further readingEdit

    • "art" in Raymond Williams, Keywords (revised), 1983, Fontana Press, page 40.

    AnagramsEdit


    AlbanianEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    Learned borrowing from Latin ars, artem.

    NounEdit

    art m (definite singular arti)

    1. art

    CatalanEdit

     
    Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
    Wikipedia ca

    EtymologyEdit

    From Latin ars.

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    art m, f (plural arts)

    1. art (something pleasing to the mind)

    Derived termsEdit

    Related termsEdit

    Further readingEdit


    CornishEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From Latin ars (art).

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    art m (plural artys)

    1. art

    Crimean TatarEdit

    NounEdit

    art

    1. back
      Synonyms: arqa, sırt

    DanishEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From Middle Low German art.

    NounEdit

    art c (singular definite arten, plural indefinite arter)

    1. kind
    2. nature
    3. species

    InflectionEdit


    FrenchEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From Latin artem, accusative singular of ars.

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    art m (plural arts)

    1. art (something pleasing to the mind)

    Derived termsEdit

    DescendantsEdit

    • Haitian Creole: la (< l'art)

    Further readingEdit

    AnagramsEdit


    IrishEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From Old Irish art, explained in glossaries as “stone”.

    NounEdit

    art m (genitive singular airt, nominative plural airt)

    1. stone

    DeclensionEdit

    Derived termsEdit

    MutationEdit

    Irish mutation
    Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
    art n-art hart not applicable
    Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

    Further readingEdit

    • "art" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
    • art” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

    LatvianEdit

     
    Art
     
    Art ar traktoru

    EtymologyEdit

    From Proto-Baltic [Term?], from Proto-Indo-European *ar-, *arə-, *h₂erh₃- (to plow), from *h₁er- (sparse; to crumble, to fall to pieces), whence also the verb irt (q.v.). Cognates include Lithuanian árti, Old Prussian artoys (plowman) (compare Lithuanian artójas), Old Church Slavonic орати (orati), Russian dialectal or dated ора́ть (orátʹ), Belarusian ара́ць (arácʹ), Ukrainian ора́ти (oráty), Bulgarian ора́ (orá), Czech orati, Polish orać, Gothic 𐌰𐍂𐌾𐌰𐌽 (arjan), Old Norse erja, Hittite ẖarra- (to crush; (passive form) to disappear), ẖarš- (to tear open; to plow), Ancient Greek ἀρόω (aróō), Latin arō.[1]

    PronunciationEdit

    (file)

    VerbEdit

    art tr., 1st conj., pres. aru, ar, ar, past aru

    1. to plow (to prepare (land) for sowing by using a plow)
      art zemito plow the land, earth
      art tīrumu, laukuto plow a field
      art dārzuto plow a garden
      art kūdraino augsnito plow the peaty soil
      art ar traktoruto plow with a tractor
      papuvi ara divi traktoritwo tractors plowed the fallow (land)
      iziet art agri no rītato go plowing early in the morning
      rudenī, rugāju arot, sekoju Jurim pa vagu un sarunājosin autumn, while (he was) plowing the stubble field, I followed Juris along the furrows and talked

    ConjugationEdit

    Derived termsEdit

    Related termsEdit

    ReferencesEdit

    1. ^ Karulis, Konstantīns (1992), “art”, in Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (in Latvian), Rīga: AVOTS, →ISBN.

    MalteseEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From Arabic أَرْض(ʾarḍ).

    NounEdit

    art f

    1. earth

    Middle EnglishEdit

    Etymology 1Edit

    From Old English eart, second person singular of wesan (to be), from Proto-Germanic *art, second person singular of *iraną.

    Alternative formsEdit

    PronunciationEdit

    VerbEdit

    art

    1. Second-person singular present indicative form of been
    Usage notesEdit

    This form is mpre common than bist for the second-person singular.

    DescendantsEdit
    • English: art (archaic or dialectal)

    Etymology 2Edit

    Borrowed from Old French art, from Latin artem, accusative form of ars, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂r̥tís.

    Alternative formsEdit

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    art (plural artes or ars)

    1. A member of the seven medieval liberal arts (the trivium and quadrivium).
    2. The seven medieval liberal arts as a group; the trivium and quadrivium combined.
    3. The foundational knowledge and activities of a field or subject (either academic or trade).
    4. Applied or practical knowledge; the execution or realisation of knowledge.
    5. Guile, craft or an instance of it; the use of deception or sleight-of hand.
    6. Competency, skill; one's aptitude or ability in a given area or at a given task.
    7. A set of rules or guidelines for conducting oneself; a code of conduct.
    8. (rare) Knowledge, information; the set of things which one has learned about (through formal study).
    9. (rare) Rhetoric; skill in oration, argument, speech, or speaking.
    10. (rare) Human behaviour or action (as opposed to natural happenings).
    DescendantsEdit
    ReferencesEdit

    Middle FrenchEdit

    NounEdit

    art m (plural ars)

    1. art
      • 15th century, Rustichello da Pisa (original author), Mazarine Master (scribe), The Travels of Marco Polo (in Middle French), page 15, line 7-8:
        Il y a de toutes choses habondance, et ils vivent de marchandise et d'art.
        There is an abundance of everything and they make a living from merchandise and from art

    DescendantsEdit

    • French: art
      • Haitian Creole: la (< l'art)

    Norwegian BokmålEdit

     
    Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
    Wikipedia no

    NounEdit

    art f, m (definite singular arta or arten, indefinite plural arter, definite plural artene)

    1. character, nature, kind
    2. (biology) a species

    Derived termsEdit

    ReferencesEdit


    Norwegian NynorskEdit

     
    Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
    Wikipedia nn

    NounEdit

    art m, f (definite singular arten or arta, indefinite plural artar or arter, definite plural artane or artene)

    1. (biology) a species

    Derived termsEdit

    ReferencesEdit


    Old FrenchEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From Latin artem, accusative of ars.

    NounEdit

    art m, f (oblique plural arz or artz, nominative singular arz or artz, nominative plural art)

    1. art (skill; practice; method)
      • Walter of Bibbesworth: Le Tretiz, ed. W. Rothwell, ANTS Plain Texts Series 6, 1990. Date of cited text: circa 1250
        ore serroit a saver de l’art a bresser & brasyr
        Now would be the time to know the art of brewing

    DescendantsEdit

    • Middle French: art
      • French: art
        • Haitian Creole: la (< l'art)
    • Norman: art
    • Walloon: årt
    • Middle English: art

    ReferencesEdit


    Old IrishEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From Proto-Celtic *artos (bear) (compare Cornish arth, Welsh arth), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ŕ̥tḱos (bear).

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    art m

    1. bear
      Synonym: mathgamain

    InflectionEdit

    Masculine o-stem
    Singular Dual Plural
    Nominative
    Vocative
    Accusative
    Genitive
    Dative
    Initial mutations of a following adjective:
    • H = triggers aspiration
    • L = triggers lenition
    • N = triggers nasalization

    MutationEdit

    Old Irish mutation
    Radical Lenition Nasalization
    art unchanged n-art
    Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
    possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

    SwedishEdit

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    art c

    1. species

    DeclensionEdit

    Declension of art 
    Singular Plural
    Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
    Nominative art arten arter arterna
    Genitive arts artens arters arternas

    TurkishEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From Proto-Turkic *hārt (back). Cognate with Old Turkic [Term?].

    NounEdit

    art (definite accusative artı, plural artlar)

    1. back

    DeclensionEdit

    Inflection
    Nominative art
    Definite accusative artı
    Singular Plural
    Nominative art artlar
    Definite accusative artı artları
    Dative arta artlara
    Locative artta artlarda
    Ablative arttan artlardan
    Genitive artın artların