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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

SuffixEdit

-st

  1. (archaic) Verb suffix for the second-person singular; Alternative form of -est
    • Macbeth
      Thou com'st to use thy tongue.

Etymology 2Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

SuffixEdit

-st

  1. Marks ordinals written in digits when the final term of the spelled number is "first"
    the 21st century
Coordinate termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

-s +‎ -t of excrescent suffixes, with -s sometimes genitive.

SuffixEdit

-st

  1. Excrescent suffix (adding sound but largely not changing the meaning).
Usage notesEdit

When there is a shorter synonymous word (as in amongst/among), the form with -st is generally considered more formal, old-fashioned, affected, or British. However, against is distinct from again, and midst is used in some context distinctly from mid.

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

The suffix -st consists of two parts: a suffix -t (Proto-Indo-European *-ti) and an inserted -s-. The -s- is the result of a wrong segmentation of stem and suffix of a noun in cases where the stem of the noun ended with -s-. For example: a word like Dutch vorst (frost) could be interpreted as vors+t or as vor+st. This suffix existed already in Gothic (𐌰𐌽𐍃𐍄𐍃 (ansts), from 𐌿𐌽𐌽𐌰𐌽 (unnan)).[1]

SuffixEdit

-st f (plural -sten)

  1. appended to the stem of a verb, this suffix yields a verbal noun; it is similar in function to the Dutch suffix -ing
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

SuffixEdit

-st

  1. appended to an adjective this suffix forms the superlative
    vreemd (strange)vreemdst (strangest)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ A. van Loey, "Schönfeld's Historische Grammatica van het Nederlands", Zutphen, 8. druk, 1970, ISBN 90-03-21170-1; § 167

GermanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

SuffixEdit

-st

  1. verb suffix for the second-person singular
    Du hast eine Katze. (You have a cat.)

Etymology 2Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

SuffixEdit

-st

  1. forming superlatives of adjectives and adverb

Derived termsEdit



HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

It was formed from -s (adjective-forming suffix) + -t (adverbial suffix) in the Old Hungarian period. The adverbial sense of the suffix -t can be shown only in this -st morpheme.[1]

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-st

  1. (adverbial suffix) Forms an adverb of manner.

Usage notesEdit

It is no longer productive and can be found only in a few adverbs: bízvást, egyenest, folyvást, homlokegyenest, mihelyst, most, oldalvást, örömest, rögvest, valamelyest.

Derived termsEdit


ReferencesEdit


IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

SuffixEdit

-st

  1. turns verbs into middle voice verbs

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch -ist, -ost, from Proto-Germanic *-istaz, *-ōstaz.

SuffixEdit

-st

  1. Forms the superlative of adjectives; -est

Derived termsEdit

See Category:Middle Dutch adjective superlative forms.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit