liquefy

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

PIE root
*dʰeh₁-

Middle English liquefien, from Anglo-Norman liquefier, from Latin liquefacere.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

liquefy ‎(third-person singular simple present liquefies, present participle liquefying, simple past and past participle liquefied)

  1. (transitive) To make into a liquid.
    We'll liquefy this rock by heating it in a furnace until it melts and flows out.
    • 1878 March 12, Gaston Tissandier, “Liquefaction of Gases”, Popular Science Monthly:
      Faraday succeeded in liquefying a certain number of gases by compression and refrigeration, but there still remained a number that proved absolutely refractory to the most powerful agencies; hence these gases were called permanent. [] A retired manufacturer, who at the same time is a distinguished man of science, M. Cailletet, has subdued the permanent gases, having succeeded in liquefying and solidifying them.
    • 2007, May Jideofo, Healthier Alternatives: Low Saturated Fat African Cooking and Recipes[1], Ukwa (Breadfruit Beans), page 38:
      Place crayfish and fresh pepper in a blender, add small water, liquefy and cook for 20 minutes or until tender.
  2. (intransitive) To become liquid.
    The substance liquefied upon heating.

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