EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English *lithnien, equivalent to lithe +‎ -en.

VerbEdit

lithen (third-person singular simple present lithens, present participle lithening, simple past and past participle lithened)

  1. (archaic) To make lithe, soften; to ease, mitigate
    • 1874, Emma Robinson, Cæsar Borgia:
      “Nay, daughter, when thou art as old as Notte it will be time enough to reckon years!” returned the dark-skinned sybil, lithening the stiff folds of a viper in a blue oil, which cast out a noisome perfume as she stirred it.
    • 1914, Mary Johnston, Sir Mortimer, page 278:
      " [] I only know that for well-nigh all the stricken he hath lithened the fever, and that he hath recalled to life many an one whom the chirurgeon had given over to the chaplain."

Etymology 2Edit

From lithe (a mixture of oatmeal and water) +‎ -en.

VerbEdit

lithen (third-person singular simple present lithens, present participle lithening, simple past and past participle lithened)

  1. (dialectal) To thicken a broth or gravy with a thickening agent (e.g. flour, oatmeal, etc.)