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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin mītigātus, from mītigō, from mītis (ripe, mature) + agō (do, make), from Proto-Indo-European *meh₁i- (mild, soft).[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɪt.ɪ.ɡeɪt/
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VerbEdit

mitigate (third-person singular simple present mitigates, present participle mitigating, simple past and past participle mitigated)

  1. (transitive) To reduce, lessen, or decrease; to make less severe or easier to bear.
  2. (transitive) To downplay.

Usage notesEdit

Particularly used as mitigate a problem or flaw. Contrast with ameliorate (make better).

This word is often misused to mean “operate” or “influence”. For this meaning, the correct word is militate, followed by “against” or “in favour of”. Mitigate is never followed by these expressions.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Coordinate termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ mitigate” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.

ItalianEdit

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

mītigāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of mītigātus