See also: -lysis

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Latin lysis, from the Ancient Greek λύσις ‎(lúsis, a loosening); compare -lysis.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lysis ‎(uncountable)

  1. (medicine, pathology) A gradual recovery from disease (opposed to crisis).
    • 1902, William James, The Varieties of Religious Experience, Folio Society 2008, p. 157:
      The older medicine used to speak of two ways, lysis and crisis, one gradual, the other abrupt, in which one might recover from a bodily disease.
  2. (biochemistry) The disintegration or destruction of cells
  3. (biochemistry) The breakdown of molecules into constituent molecules

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Ancient Greek λύσις ‎(lúsis).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lysis f ‎(genitive lysis); third declension

  1. loosening
  2. rupture (breaking away)

InflectionEdit

Third declension, alternative accusative singular in -im, alternative ablative singular in and accusative plural in -īs.

Case Singular Plural
nominative lysis lysēs
genitive lysis lysium
dative lysī lysibus
accusative lysem
lysim
lysēs
lysīs
ablative lyse
lysī
lysibus
vocative lysis lysēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • lysis in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • lysis in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • lysis in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • lysis in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • lysis in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  • lysis in William Smith., editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly
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