See also: Temple and templé

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: tĕm'p(ə)l, IPA(key): /ˈtɛmp(ə)l/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛmpəl

Etymology 1Edit

 
The Temple of Isis from Philae (Egypt)
 
Maison Carrée from Nîmes (France), one of the best preserved Roman temples to survive in the territory of the former Roman Empire
 
Ryusenji temple from Osaka (Japan)

From Middle English temple, from Old English templ, tempel, borrowed from Latin templum (shrine, temple, area for auspices). Compare Old High German tempal (temple), also a borrowing from the Latin.

NounEdit

temple (plural temples)

  1. A house of worship, especially:
    1. A house of worship dedicated to a polytheistic faith.
      The temple of Zeus was very large.
      • 1974, DeGlopper, Donald R., “Religion and Ritual in Lukang”, in Arthur P. Wolf, editor, Religion and Ritual in Chinese Society (Studies in Chinese Society)‎[1], Stanford: Stanford University Press, →ISBN, LCCN 73-89863, OCLC 844556505, page 46:
        As of October 1968 Lukang, which had a resident population of between 27,000 and 28,000 people, had 39 temples. It is my impression that Lukang has more temples than do most Taiwanese communities of equivalent size. By temple I mean a structure that houses an image, altar, and incense pot, and is freely accessible to the general public. In speaking of the 39 temples of Lukang, I am omitting the numerous small shrines to the unknown dead (Yu Ying Kung), buildings dedicated to ancestors rather than deities (two), Christian churches (four), incense-burner associations that keep their incense pot or image in private homes, and private shrines such as the domestic altars of tang-ki (spirit mediums) or the shrine of the now defunct Ch'üan-chou guild, found in the back room of a drugstore endowed with the guild property.[...]Lukang, seen in comparative perspective, has a lot of temples.
    2. (Judaism) Synonym of synagogue, especially a non-Orthodox synagogue.
      How often do you go to temple?
    3. (Mormonism) A church closed to non-Mormons and necessary for particular rituals.
    4. (in Japan) A Buddhist house of worship, as opposed to a Shinto shrine.
  2. A meeting house of the Oddfellows fraternity; its members.
  3. (figuratively) Any place regarded as holding a religious presence.
  4. (figuratively) Any place seen as an important centre for some activity.
    a temple of commerce, a temple of drinking and dining
  5. (figuratively) Anything regarded as important or minutely cared for.
    My body is my temple.
  6. (figuratively) A gesture wherein the forefingers are outstretched and touch pad to pad while the other fingers are clasped together.
    • 2010, James LePore, A World I Never Made, page 251:
      Again Abdullah listened intently, his eyes closed, his ten fingers forming a temple of his hands in front of him.
Usage notesEdit
  • This word is rarely used in English to refer to a Christian house of worship, especially in Western Christianity.
SynonymsEdit
HyponymsEdit
Coordinate termsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

temple (third-person singular simple present temples, present participle templing, simple past and past participle templed)

  1. (transitive) To build a temple for; to appropriate a temple to; to temple a god
    • 1623, Owen Feltham, Resolves: Divine, Moral, Political
      though the Heathen (in many places) Templed and adored this drunken God

Etymology 2Edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
Temple in anatomy

From Middle English temple, from Old French temple, from Vulgar Latin *temp(u)la, from Latin tempora (the temples), plural of tempus (temple, head, face). See temporal bone.

NounEdit

temple (plural temples)

  1. (anatomy) The slightly flatter region, on either side of the human head, behind of the eye and forehead, above the zygomatic arch, and forward of the ear.
  2. (ophthalmology) Either of the sidepieces on a set of spectacles, extending backwards from the hinge toward the ears and, usually, turning down around them.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Borrowed from Latin templum (a small timber, a purlin); compare templet and template.

NounEdit

temple (plural temples)

  1. (weaving) A contrivance used in a loom for keeping the web stretched transversely.
TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin templum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

temple m (plural temples)

  1. temple (building)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French temple, borrowed from Latin templum, from Proto-Indo-European *t(e)mp-lo-s, from the root *temp- (to stretch, string).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

temple m (plural temples)

  1. temple (for worship)
  2. hall
    Le Temple de la renommée du hockey.
    The Hockey Hall of Fame.

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Vulgar Latin *temp(u)la, from Latin tempora, plural of tempus.

NounEdit

temple m (oblique plural temples, nominative singular temples, nominative plural temple)

  1. (anatomy) temple
DescendantsEdit
  • French: tempe
  • Middle English: temple

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Latin templum.

NounEdit

temple m (oblique plural temples, nominative singular temples, nominative plural temple)

  1. temple (building where religious services take place)
DescendantsEdit

Old SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan temple or Old French temple. Compare the inherited tiemplo and the learned form templo, all ultimately from Latin templum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

temple m (plural temples)

  1. temple
    • c. 1200, Almerich, Fazienda de Ultramar, f. 53v.
      embiol ael aſenachaerib toda la plata q́ pudo trobar en la del criador. e el teſoro de los reẏſ. eſtoz cranto ezechias las puertas del temple e todo quanto pudo aù embiolo al reẏ de ſiria esto peſo al criador
      He sent Sennacherib all the silver he could find in the [house] of the Creator and the treasury of the kings. Then Hezekiah broke the doors of the temple and all that there was he sent to the king of Assyria. This weighed upon the Creator.

SynonymsEdit


RomanianEdit

NounEdit

temple

  1. plural of templu

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Regressively derived from the verb templar.

NounEdit

temple m (plural temples)

  1. mood; humour (of a person)
    • 1897, Benito Pérez Galdós, Misericordia:
      Halló a Doña Paca de mal temple, porque se había parecido en la casa, muy de mañana, un dependiente de la tienda, y habíala insultado con expresiones brutales y soeces.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  2. mettle; courage; spunk
  3. tempering
  4. temperature
  5. (music) tuning
  6. (bullfighting) a move of the cape before a charge

VerbEdit

temple

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of templar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of templar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of templar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of templar.

Further readingEdit