rupture

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French rupture, or its source, Latin ruptūra (a breaking, rupture (of a limb or vein)) and Medieval Latin ruptūra (a road, a field, a form of feudal tenure, a tax, etc.), from the participle stem of rumpere (to break, burst).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɹʌptʃə/
    • (file)

NounEdit

rupture (countable and uncountable, plural ruptures)

  1. A burst, split, or break.
  2. A social breach or break, between individuals or groups.
    • 1825, Edward Everett, Claims of the United States on Naples and Holland
      He knew that policy would disincline Napoleon from a rupture with his family.
    • 1761, The Modern Part of an Universal History
      Thus a war was kindled with Lubec; Denmark took part with the king's enemies, and made use of a frivolous pretence, which demonstrated the inclination of his Danish majesty to come to a rupture.
  3. (medicine) A break or tear in soft tissue, such as a muscle.
  4. (engineering) A failure mode in which a tough ductile material pulls apart rather than cracking.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

rupture (third-person singular simple present ruptures, present participle rupturing, simple past and past participle ruptured)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To burst, break through, or split, as under pressure.
  2. (botany, intransitive) To dehisce irregularly.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

Category:English terms derived from the PIE root *Hrewp-


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rupture f (plural ruptures)

  1. breakup, rupture

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

rupture

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

ruptūre

  1. vocative masculine singular of ruptūrus