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See also: Maner, mâner, and måner

Contents

DanishEdit

NounEdit

maner c

  1. indefinite plural of man

VerbEdit

maner

  1. present of mane

LatinEdit

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Old French manoir, from Latin manēre (to stay).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /manˈɛːr/, /ˈmanər/, /manˈuːr/

NounEdit

maner (plural maneres)

  1. A manorial estate or property; a manor.
  2. A mansion; the house on such an estate.
  3. (figuratively, Late Middle English, rare) Any dwelling or abode.
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman manere, from Vulgar Latin, Late Latin manuāria, from manuarius.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /manˈɛːr(ə)/, /ˈmanər(ə)/, /maːnˈɛːr(ə)/, /ˈmaːnər(ə)/

NounEdit

maner (plural maneres or maner)

  1. The manner, way, fashion or method in which something is done or performed:
    1. The usual practice or custom of someone; that which one is wont to do.
    2. One's behaviour or actions; manners, especially if commendable.
    3. A group of people's customs, practices, or traditions.
    4. A moral code or precept; guidelines or recommendations.
  2. A sort, kind, or group; an ethnicity or people.
  3. A genre, format, or variety of art or literature.
  4. The characteristics, state, composition or structure of something; its innate nature.
  5. The situation or conditions surrounding an event.
  6. Temperance; withholding oneself from excess.
  7. Justification; reason, basis, cause.
  8. (rare) A provision; a statement depending on a condition.
  9. (rare) A restriction or bound.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

DeterminerEdit

maner

  1. (in Wycliffe) some specifically, certain, these
ReferencesEdit

WelshEdit

NounEdit

maner

  1. Nasal mutation of baner.