See also: Mano, manó, manō, mano-, and -mano

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish mano (hand). Doublet of manus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mano (plural manos)

  1. a stone resembling a rolling pin, used to grind maize or other grain on a metate

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AfarEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mʌˈno/
  • Hyphenation: ma‧no

NounEdit

manó f 

  1. life

ReferencesEdit

  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[1], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis)

AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin manus, from Proto-Italic *manus, from Proto-Indo-European *méh₂-r̥ ~ *mh₂-én-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mano f (plural manes)

  1. hand

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mano

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of manar

CebuanoEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Spanish mano, from Old Spanish mano, from Latin manus, from Proto-Italic *manus, from Proto-Indo-European *méh₂-r̥ ~ *mh₂-én-.

NounEdit

mano

  1. a schoolyard pick
  2. (dated) the hand

VerbEdit

mano

  1. to pick an it
  2. to take turns picking a team or members of a team
  3. to pick the order of players in a game

Etymology 2Edit

Compare manong and manoy.

NounEdit

mano

  1. an elder
  2. a term of address for an old man

Etymology 3Edit

Unknown.

NounEdit

mano

  1. a bundle of tobacco leaves

Etymology 4Edit

Unknown.

VerbEdit

mano

  1. to lag

ChavacanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish mano (hand).

NounEdit

mano

  1. (anatomy) hand

ChichewaEdit

NounEdit

manó 6

  1. plural of dzino

ChuukeseEdit

VerbEdit

mano

  1. to die

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian mano, French main and Latin manus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈmano]
  • Audio:
    (file)
  • Rhymes: -ano
  • Hyphenation: ma‧no

NounEdit

mano (accusative singular manon, plural manoj, accusative plural manojn)

  1. (anatomy) hand
    • 1999, Trans. Edwin Grobe, Mark Twain: Tri Noveloj, [2]
      Vi metu monon en la manojn de tia viro nur se vi deziras lin detrui, tio estas fakto.
      You put money in the hands of that type of man only if you want to destroy him, that is a fact.

Derived termsEdit


IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English manesFrench mânesGerman ManenSpanish manes, all ultimately from Latin manes.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mano (plural mani)

  1. (a single) manes, ancestral spirit

Derived termsEdit

  • mani (manes, ancestral spirits)

InterlinguaEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mano (plural manos)

  1. hand

ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it
 
mano (a hand)

EtymologyEdit

From Latin manus (whence also English manual, etc.), from Proto-Italic *manus, from Proto-Indo-European *méh₂-r̥ ~ *mh₂-én-.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈma.no/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ano
  • Hyphenation: mà‧no

NounEdit

mano f (plural mani) diminutive: manina

  1. (anatomy) hand
  2. band, company (Boccaccio; v. manus)
  3. round

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


JamamadíEdit

NounEdit

mano m

  1. (Banawá, anatomy) arm

ReferencesEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Proto-Indo-European root *meh₂- (wet, damp).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mānō (present infinitive mānāre, perfect active mānāvī, supine mānātum); first conjugation

  1. (transitive) I give out, shed, pour forth
  2. (intransitive) I flow, run, trickle, drop, distil, run; to leak
  3. (intransitive) I flow, diffuse or extend myself, spread
  4. (intransitive, figuratively, of secrets) I spread, leak out, become known
  5. (intransitive, figuratively) I flow, spring, arise, proceed, emanate, originate

ConjugationEdit

   Conjugation of mānō (first conjugation)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present mānō mānās mānat mānāmus mānātis mānant
imperfect mānābam mānābās mānābat mānābāmus mānābātis mānābant
future mānābō mānābis mānābit mānābimus mānābitis mānābunt
perfect mānāvī mānāvistī mānāvit mānāvimus mānāvistis mānāvērunt, mānāvēre
pluperfect mānāveram mānāverās mānāverat mānāverāmus mānāverātis mānāverant
future perfect mānāverō mānāveris mānāverit mānāverimus mānāveritis mānāverint
passive present mānor mānāris, mānāre mānātur mānāmur mānāminī mānantur
imperfect mānābar mānābāris, mānābāre mānābātur mānābāmur mānābāminī mānābantur
future mānābor mānāberis, mānābere mānābitur mānābimur mānābiminī mānābuntur
perfect mānātus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect mānātus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect mānātus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present mānem mānēs mānet mānēmus mānētis mānent
imperfect mānārem mānārēs mānāret mānārēmus mānārētis mānārent
perfect mānāverim mānāverīs mānāverit mānāverīmus mānāverītis mānāverint
pluperfect mānāvissem mānāvissēs mānāvisset mānāvissēmus mānāvissētis mānāvissent
passive present māner mānēris, mānēre mānētur mānēmur mānēminī mānentur
imperfect mānārer mānārēris, mānārēre mānārētur mānārēmur mānārēminī mānārentur
perfect mānātus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect mānātus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present mānā mānāte
future mānātō mānātō mānātōte mānantō
passive present mānāre mānāminī
future mānātor mānātor mānantor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives mānāre mānāvisse mānātūrum esse mānārī mānātum esse mānātum īrī
participles mānāns mānātūrus mānātus mānandus
verbal nouns gerund supine
genitive dative accusative ablative accusative ablative
mānandī mānandō mānandum mānandō mānātum mānātū

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: manation
  • Portuguese: manar
  • Spanish: manar

ReferencesEdit

  • mano in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mano in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mano in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[3], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to drip blood; to be deluged with blood: sanguine manare, redundare
    • to originate in, arise from: ex aliqua re nasci, manare
    • these things have the same origin: haec ex eodem fonte fluunt, manant
    • report says; people say: rumor, fama, sermo est or manat
    • (ambiguous) to abide by, persist in one's opinion: in sententia manere, permanere, perseverare, perstare
    • (ambiguous) to remain loyal: in fide manere (B. G. 7. 4. 5)
    • (ambiguous) to remain faithful to one's duty: in officio manere (Att. 1. 3)
    • (ambiguous) to remain in subjection: in officio manere, permanere

LithuanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Appears to be a new formation built from mãn-, the oblique stem of àš + the masculine genitive ending ; compare (his), tàvo (your), sàvo (one's own). Dialectal mãnas (my) matches Latvian mans (my), while Old Prussian mais (my) is an independent formation. Compare however Sudovian mano (my), which suggests the formation may be old.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

màno (indeclinable)

  1. (possessive) my, mine
    esì màno geriáusias draũgas.You are my best friend.
    Tàs vaĩkas màno.That kid is not mine.
  2. by me (used to indicate a first person singular agent in passive constructions)
    Taĩ bùvo pìrmas màno rašýtas laĩškas põpieriuje.That was the first letter written by me on paper.

Related termsEdit

Usage notesEdit

If the subject of the sentence is first-person singular (i.e., àš), then the reflexive pronoun sàvo is used instead. For example:

Àš mýliu sàvo žmõną.
I love my wife.

See alsoEdit


MaoriEdit

NounEdit

mano

  1. host
  2. creed

NumeralEdit

mano

  1. thousand

MirandeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin manus, from Proto-Indo-European *méh₂-r̥ ~ *mh₂-én-.

NounEdit

mano f (plural manos)

  1. (anatomy) hand

NeapolitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin manus.

NounEdit

mano f (plural mmane)

  1. hand

Old DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *mānō.

NounEdit

māno m

  1. moon

InflectionEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • māno”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *mānō, whence also Old English mōna, Old Norse máni

NounEdit

māno m

  1. moon

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *mānō, whence also Old English mōna, Old Norse máni

NounEdit

māno m

  1. moon

DeclensionEdit


DescendantsEdit


PaliEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

mano

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative singular of manas

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): (Brazil) /ˈmɐ̃.nu/, [ˈmɐ̃.nu]
  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /ˈmɐ.nu/, [ˈmɐ.nu]

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Spanish mano, apheresis of hermano (brother, sibling).

NounEdit

mano m (plural manos, feminine mana, feminine plural manas)

  1. (informal) brother, male sibling
  2. (informal) bro, homie
    Esse cara aqui é o meu mano
    this dude right here is my bro
  3. (informal) dude, bro, man
    Mano, tu tá de palhaçada com a minha cara, né?
    Dude, you're joking with me, right?
    Mano, assiste esse vídeo que eu te mandei!
    Man watch this video I sent you!
Usage notesEdit
  • Do not confuse with mão (hand).

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

mano

  1. first-person singular (eu) present indicative of manar

SpanishEdit

Sense 1

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Spanish mano, from Latin manus, from Proto-Italic *manus, from Proto-Indo-European *méh₂-r̥ ~ *mh₂-én-.

NounEdit

mano f (plural manos)

  1. (anatomy, of a person) hand
  2. (of an animal) front foot
  3. (in a game) round; hand
  4. (of paint) coat, lick
  5. (of a clock) hand
  6. skill, talent
  7. mano (a stone resembling a rolling pin, used to grind maize or other grain on a metate)
    Synonym: metlapil
  8. (colloquial, Central America, Caribbean, Mexico) buddy, bro, man, mate, pal
Usage notesEdit
  • As with other nouns denoting body parts, the definite article la (the) is used where English would use a possessive determiner (e.g. my, your, his, or her), as long as the verb that it complements is pronominal and therefore implies possession. Examples: "Lávate las manos, por favor" and "Átale las manos"; contrast with "Dibuja tus manos".
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Apheresis of hermano.

NounEdit

mano m (plural manos, feminine mana, feminine plural manas)

  1. (slang, Mexico) buddy, friend

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

mano

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of manar.

Further readingEdit