certain

See also: Certain and cèrtain

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English certeyn, certein, certain, borrowed from Old French certain, from a Vulgar Latin unattested form *certānus, extended form of Latin certus (fixed, resolved, certain), of the same origin as cretus, past participle of cernere (to separate, perceive, decide). Displaced native Middle English wis, iwis (certain, sure) (from Old English ġewiss (certain, sure)) and alternative Middle English spelling sertane (some, certain)

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

 
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certain (comparative more certain, superlative most certain)

  1. Sure, positive, not doubting.
    I was certain of my decision.
    Spain is now certain of a place in the finals.
  2. (obsolete) Determined; resolved.
  3. Not to be doubted or denied; established as a fact.
  4. Actually existing; sure to happen; inevitable.
    Bankruptcy is the certain outcome of your constant gambling and lending.
  5. Unfailing; infallible.
    • 1702, Richard Mead, Mechanical Account of Poisons
      I have often wished, that I knew so certain a remedy in any other disease
  6. Fixed or stated; regular; determinate.
  7. Known but not specifically named; indeterminate; indefinite; one or some; sometimes used independently as a noun, and meaning certain persons; see also "one".

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

DeterminerEdit

certain

  1. Having been determined but not specified. The quality of some particular subject or object which is known by the speaker to have been specifically singled out among similar entities of its class.
    Certain people are good at running.

TranslationsEdit

PronounEdit

certain

  1. (with of) Unnamed or undescribed members (of).
    She mentioned a series of contracts, of which certain are not cited.

SynonymsEdit

  • (unnamed or undescribed members (of)): some

NounEdit

certain pl (plural only)

  1. (with "the") Something certain.
    • 2011, John Lyons, The Phantom of Chance: From Fortune to Randomness in Seventeenth-Century French Literature[1]:
      Thinking about the uncertain refines our perception of the certain, and generally this takes place in a framework in which the uncertain is the future and the certain is the present.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French certain, from Vulgar Latin unattested form *certānus, extended form of Latin certus (fixed, resolved, certain).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

certain (feminine singular certaine, masculine plural certains, feminine plural certaines)

  1. certain (sure, positive)
    Il est certain qu'il viendra.
    It is certain that he will arrive.
  2. certain (fixed, determined)
  3. certain (specified, particular)
Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

certain m (plural certains)

  1. certain; certainty

DeterminerEdit

certain

  1. certain: a determined but unspecified amount of ; some
    Certaines personnes vont aller.
    Some people are going.

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *certānus, from Latin certus. Compare Old Italian and Old Spanish certano.

AdjectiveEdit

certain m (oblique and nominative feminine singular certaine)

  1. certain; sure

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: certeyn
  • French: certain