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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

After the example of 17th-century French army officer Jean Martinet.

NounEdit

martinet (plural martinets)

  1. (military) A strict disciplinarian.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter I, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314, page 0105:
      Captain Edward Carlisle, soldier as he was, martinet as he was, felt a curious sensation of helplessness seize upon him as he met her steady gaze, her alluring smile ; he could not tell what this prisoner might do.
  2. (figuratively) Anyone who lays stress on a rigid adherence to the details of discipline, or to forms and fixed methods or rules.

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from French martinet.

NounEdit

martinet (plural martinets)

  1. A martin; a swift.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From marteau (hammer), from Latin martulus (hammer)

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /maʁ.ti.nɛ/
  • (file)

NounEdit

martinet m (plural martinets)

  1. a multi-tail whip, comprising leather or whipcord thongs fixed on a handle, to dust off or to administer a beating (usually to a child's bottom)
  2. a mechanical hammer on a motor-driven cogwheel, as used to beat metal
  3. a martin; any of the swallow-like birds, black with a white throat, of family Hirundinidae.
  4. swift (bird)

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