See also: discipliné

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Anglo-Norman, from Old French descipline, from Latin disciplina ‎(instruction) and discipulus ‎(pupil), from discere ‎(to learn), from Proto-Indo-European *dek- ‎((cause to) accept).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

discipline ‎(plural disciplines)

  1. A controlled behaviour; self-control.
    • Rogers
      The most perfect, who have their passions in the best discipline, are yet obliged to be constantly on their guard.
  2. An enforced compliance or control.
    • 1956, Michael Arlen, chapter 1/1/2, in “Piracy”: A Romantic Chronicle of These Days[1]:
      The masters looked unusually stern, but it was the sternness of thought rather than of discipline.
  3. A systematic method of obtaining obedience.
    • C. J. Smith
      Discipline aims at the removal of bad habits and the substitution of good ones, especially those of order, regularity, and obedience.
  4. A state of order based on submission to authority.
    • Dryden
      Their wildness lose, and, quitting nature's part, / Obey the rules and discipline of art.
  5. A punishment to train or maintain control.
    • Addison
      giving her the discipline of the strap
  6. (Catholicism): A whip used for self-flagellation.
  7. A set of rules regulating behaviour.
  8. A flagellation as a means of obtaining sexual gratification.
  9. A specific branch of knowledge or learning.
    • 2013 August 3, “Boundary problems”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8847:
      Economics is a messy discipline: too fluid to be a science, too rigorous to be an art.
    • 1648, John Wilkins, Mathematical Magick:
      This mathematical discipline, by the help of geometrical principles, doth teach to contrive several weights and powers unto motion or rest.
  10. A category in which a certain art, sport or other activity belongs.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

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Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

discipline ‎(third-person singular simple present disciplines, present participle disciplining, simple past and past participle disciplined)

  1. (transitive) To train someone by instruction and practice.
  2. (transitive) To teach someone to obey authority.
  3. (transitive) To punish someone in order to (re)gain control.
  4. (transitive) To impose order on someone.

SynonymsEdit

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DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: dis‧ci‧pli‧ne

NounEdit

discipline f ‎(plural disciplines, diminutive disciplinetje n)

  1. discipline, sanction
  2. discipline, self-control
  3. discipline, branch

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FrenchEdit

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

discipline f pl

  1. plural of disciplina

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

discipline

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of disciplinar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of disciplinar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of disciplinar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of disciplinar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

discipline

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of disciplinar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of disciplinar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of disciplinar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of disciplinar.
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