See also: martin, martîn, Martín, and Martîn

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Latin Mārtīnus (of or like Mars” or “little Mars), Mārs, Mārtis + -īnus (diminutive suffix). Furthermore, the name Mārs is likely to have been brought into Latin from elsewhere, likely the Etruscan Maris that was their name for the same deity.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Martin (countable and uncountable, plural Martins)

  1. A male given name from Latin originally given in honor of a fourth century soldier-saint.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, “The First Part of Henry the Sixt”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, (please specify the scene number in lowercase Roman numerals)]:
      :Scene 2:
      Expect Saint Martin's summer, halcyon days, / Since I have entered into these wars.
    • 1767 Laurence Sterne, Tristram Shandy, Book IV ( Slawkenbergius's Tale ):
      Luther was not born in the year 1483, but in 84; and not on the 22nd day of October, but on the 10th of November, the eve of Martinmas day, from whence he had the name of Martin. - - - Now you see, brother Toby, he would say, looking up, "that christian names are not such indifferent things;" - Had Luther here been called by any other name but Martin, he would have been damned to all eternity - Not that I look upon Martin, he would add, as a good name - far from it - 'tis something better than a neutral, and but a little - yet little as it is, you see it was of some service to him.
    • 1933 Eleanor Farjeon, Over the Garden Wall, Faber and Faber, page 90 ("Boys' Names")
      What splendid names for boys there are! / There's Carol like a rolling car, / And Martin like a flying bird,/
    • 2006 Kate Atkinson, One Good Turn, Black Swan(2007), →ISBN, page 81:
      Martin was pretty dull as names went but 'Alex Blake' had a certain dash to it. His publishers hadn't considered Martin's own name to be 'punchy' enough.
  2. A patronymic surname, from given names​.
  3. An surname, from Middle English for someone who lived near a mere.
  4. A small city, the county seat of Bennett County, South Dakota, United States.
  5. A village in Langdon parish, Dover district, Kent, England (OS grid ref TR3347).

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

StatisticsEdit

  • According to the 2010 United States Census, Martin is the 20th most common surname in the United States, belonging to 702,625 individuals. Martin is most common among White (74.8%) and Black/African American (15.8%) individuals.

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Mārtīnus (of or like Mars” or “little Mars) (Mārs, Mārtis + -īnus (diminutive suffix)).

Proper nounEdit

Martin (m Martini)

  1. a male given name from Latin, equivalent to English Martin (indefinite form)
  2. a male surname, equivalent to the English Martin, from Latin​. (indefinite form)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish Martín, from Latin Mārtīnus (of or like Mars” or “little Mars), Mārs, Mārtis + -īnus (diminutive suffix).

Proper nounEdit

Martin

  1. a male given name from Latin, equivalent to English Martin
  2. a surname, from Latin

CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Mārtīnus (of or like Mars” or “little Mars), Mārs, Mārtis + -īnus (diminutive suffix).

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Martin m

  1. A male given name from Latin, equivalent to English Martin. Feminine form: Martina

AdjectiveEdit

Martin

  1. possessive of Marta: Marta's

Further readingEdit

  • Martin in Kartotéka Novočeského lexikálního archivu

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Mārtīnus (of or like Mars” or “little Mars), Mārs, Mārtis + -īnus (diminutive suffix).

Proper nounEdit

Martin

  1. A male given name from Latin, equivalent to English Martin.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • [1] Danskernes Navne, based on CPR data: 58 178 males with the given name Martin have been registered in Denmark between about 1890 (=the population alive in 1967) and January 2005, with the frequency peak in the 1980s. Accessed on 19 June 2011.

EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Mārtīnus (of or like Mars” or “little Mars), Mārs, Mārtis + -īnus (diminutive suffix).

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Martin

  1. A male given name from Latin, equivalent to English Martin.

Related termsEdit


FaroeseEdit

Proper nounEdit

Martin m

  1. A male given name from Latin, equivalent to English Martin.

Usage notesEdit

Patronymics

  • son of Martin: Martinsson
  • daughter of Martin: Martinsdóttir

DeclensionEdit

Singular
Indefinite
Nominative Martin
Accusative Martin
Dative Martini
Genitive Martins

FinnishEdit

Proper nounEdit

Martin

  1. genitive singular of Martti

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin Mārtīnus (of or like Mars” or “little Mars), from Mars + -īnus (diminutive suffix).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /maʁ.tɛ̃/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛ̃

Proper nounEdit

Martin m

  1. A male given name from Latin, equivalent to English Martin. Feminine form: Martine.
  2. A patronymic surname​.

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Mārtīnus (of or like Mars” or “little Mars), Mārs, Mārtis + -īnus (diminutive suffix).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmarˌtiːn/, [ˈmaʁ-], [ˈmaɐ̯-], [ˈmaː-]
  • IPA(key): /ˈmar.tɪn/ (somewhat less common)

Proper nounEdit

Martin

  1. A male given name from Latin, equivalent to English Martin
  2. A patronymic surname, from given names​.

Related termsEdit


NorwegianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Mārtīnus (of or like Mars” or “little Mars), Mārs, Mārtis + -īnus (diminutive suffix). First recorded in Norway ca. 1200.

Proper nounEdit

Martin

  1. A male given name from Latin, equivalent to English Martin.

Usage notesEdit

  • The most common given name of men born in Norway in the 1990s.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Kristoffer Kruken - Ola Stemshaug: Norsk personnamnleksikon, Det Norske Samlaget, Oslo 1995, →ISBN
  • [2] Statistisk sentralbyrå, Namnestatistikk: 20 132 males with the given name Martin living in Norway on January 1st 2011, with the frequency peak in the 1990s. Accessed on April 29th, 2011.

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Mārtīnus (of or like Mars” or “little Mars), Mārs, Mārtis + -īnus (diminutive suffix).

Proper nounEdit

Martin m (nominative singular Martins)

  1. A male given name from Latin, equivalent to English Martin

SlovakEdit

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Martin m (genitive Martina, nominative plural Martinovia, declension pattern of chlap)

  1. A male given name from Latin, equivalent to English Martin.

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • Martin in Slovak dictionaries at slovnik.juls.savba.sk

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Mārtīnus (of or like Mars” or “little Mars), Mārs, Mārtis + -īnus (diminutive suffix).

Proper nounEdit

Martin c (genitive Martins)

  1. A male given name from Latin, equivalent to English Martin.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Roland Otterbjörk: Svenska förnamn, Almqvist & Wiksell 1996, →ISBN
  • [3] Statistiska centralbyrån and Sture Allén, Staffan Wåhlin, Förnamnsboken, Norstedts 1995, →ISBN: 72 420 males with the given name Martin living in Sweden on December 31st, 2010, with the frequency peak in the 1980s. Accessed on 19 June 2011.