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See also: Merch. and merc'h

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Clipping of merchandise.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

merch (uncountable)

  1. (slang) merchandise
    • 2007, February 15, “Eric Wilson”, in Babes in Label Land[1]:
      His playful point of view on youthful American sportswear, expressed in boxy mohair jackets with graphic resin bubble buttons and tomboy T-shirt dresses in superfine chiffon as bright as tangerine sorbet, is backed up with what stores would describe as the merch: easy scoop-neck cashmere sweaters in a mix of colors, lightweight T-shirts and sheared mink Army caps.
    • 2012, Jesse Cannon, ‎Todd Thomas, Get More Fans: The DIY Guide to the New Music Business
      Many musicians make merch you can only get if you join the fanclub.

WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Brythonic *merx, from Proto-Celtic *merkā (compare Cornish myrgh, mergh, Breton merc’h), from Proto-Indo-European *méryos (boy, girl) (compare Scottish Gaelic smarach (lad), Latin marītus (husband), Ancient Greek μεῖραξ (meîrax, boy, girl), Old Armenian մարի (mari)). Related to morwyn.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

merch f (plural merched)

  1. daughter
  2. girl, maiden
    Peidiwch â phoeni'r merched yn y babell nesa.Don't pester the girls in the next tent.
    [1]

Coordinate termsEdit

  • mab (son)
  • mam (mother)
  • tad (father)

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
merch ferch unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • merch”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies, 2014