EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English minde, münde, ȝemünde, from Old English mynd, ġemynd (memory), from Proto-Germanic *mundiz, *gamundiz (memory, remembrance), from Proto-Indo-European *méntis (thought), from Proto-Indo-European *men- (to think). Cognate with Old High German gimunt (mind, memory), Danish minde (memory), Icelandic minni (memory, recall, recollection), Gothic 𐌼𐌿𐌽𐌳𐍃 (munds, memory, mind), Latin mēns (mind, reason), Sanskrit मनस् (mánas), Ancient Greek μένος (ménos), Albanian mënd (mind, reason). Related to Old English myntan (to mean, intend, purpose, determine, resolve). More at mint.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mind (countable and uncountable, plural minds)

  1. The ability of rational thought.
    • 1576, George Whetstone, “The Ortchard of Repentance: []”, in The Rocke of Regard, [], London: [] [H. Middleton] for Robert Waley, OCLC 837515946; republished in J[ohn] P[ayne] Collier, editor, The Rocke of Regard, [] (Illustrations of Early English Poetry; vol. 2, no. 2), London: Privately printed, [1867?], OCLC 706027473, page 291:
      And ſure, although it was invented to eaſe his mynde of griefe, there be a number of caveats therein to forewarne other young gentlemen to foreſtand with good government their folowing yl fortunes; []
      #*
      1910, Emerson Hough, chapter I, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314:
      [] it is not fair of you to bring against mankind double weapons ! Dangerous enough you are as woman alone, without bringing to your aid those gifts of mind suited to problems which men have been accustomed to arrogate to themselves.”
    Despite advancing age, his mind was still as sharp as ever.
  2. The ability to be aware of things.
    There was no doubt in his mind that they would win.
  3. The ability to remember things.
    My mind just went blank.
  4. The ability to focus the thoughts.
    I can’t keep my mind on what I’m doing.
  5. Somebody that embodies certain mental qualities.
    He was one of history’s greatest minds.
  6. Judgment, opinion, or view.
    He changed his mind after hearing the speech.
  7. Desire, inclination, or intention.
    She had a mind to go to Paris.
    I have half a mind to do it myself.
    I am of a mind to listen.
    • 1859, Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities:
      Although Miss Pross, through her long association with a French family, might have known as much of their language as of her own, if she had had a mind, she had no mind in that direction [] So her manner of marketing was to plump a noun-substantive at the head of a shopkeeper without any introduction in the nature of an article []
  8. A healthy mental state.
    I, ______ being of sound mind and body, do hereby []
    You are losing your mind.
  9. (philosophy) The non-material substance or set of processes in which consciousness, perception, affectivity, judgement, thinking, and will are based.
    The mind is a process of the brain.
    • 1699, William Temple, Heads designed for an essay on conversations
      Study gives strength to the mind; conversation, grace: the first apt to give stiffness, the other suppleness: one gives substance and form to the statue, the other polishes it.
    • 1854, Samuel Knaggs, Unsoundness of Mind Considered in Relation to the Question of Responsibility for Criminal Acts, p.19:
      The mind is that part of our being which thinks and wills, remembers and reasons; we know nothing of it except from these functions.
    • 1883, Howard Pyle, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood Chapter V
      Thus they dwelled for nearly a year, and in that time Robin Hood often turned over in his mind many means of making an even score with the Sheriff.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 7, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      [] St. Bede's at this period of its history was perhaps the poorest and most miserable parish in the East End of London. Close-packed, crushed by the buttressed height of the railway viaduct, rendered airless by huge walls of factories, it at once banished lively interest from a stranger's mind and left only a dull oppression of the spirit.
  10. Continual prayer on a dead person's behalf for a period after their death.
    a month's [or monthly] mind; a year's mind
  11. (uncountable) Attention, consideration or thought.
    • 1849, Eliza Cook, Eliza Cook’s Journal,p.119:
      They are the “tars” who give mind to the spreading sail, and their bold courage is the pabulum which will preserve our sea-girt isle in its vernal green to furthest posterity.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      Then he, having mind of Beelzebub, the god of flies, fled without a halt homewards; but, falling in the coo's loan, broke two ribs and a collar bone, the whilk misfortune was much blessed to his soul.
    • 2014, Jolie O'Dell, Blogging for Photographers, page 66:
      If you get a “trolling” comment, delete it, do not respond to it, and move forward immediately without paying any further mind.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Compound words derived from mind (noun)
Expressions derived from mind (noun)

DescendantsEdit

  • Japanese: マインド (maindo)
  • Malay: minda

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

mind (third-person singular simple present minds, present participle minding, simple past and past participle minded)

  1. To bring or recall to mind; to remember; bear or keep in mind.
    • 1878, Robert Browning, La Saisiaz, line 70:
      Mind to-morrow's early meeting!
  2. (now regional) To remember. [from 14th c.]
  3. (obsolete or dialectical) To remind; put one's mind on.
  4. To turn one's mind to; to observe; to notice.
    • ca. 1610–11, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act II, sc. 2:
      Here comes a spirit of his, and to torment me / For bringing wood in slowly. I'll fall flat; / Perchance he will not mind me.
  5. To regard with attention; to treat as of consequence.
    • 1611, King James Translators, Romans 12:16:
      Be of the same mind one toward another. Mind not high things, but condescend to men of low estate. Be not wise in your own conceits.
    • 1907 E.M. Forster, The Longest Journey, Part I, V [Uniform ed., p. 63]:
      It's the worst thing that can ever happen to you in all your life, and you've got to mind it—you've got to mind it. They'll come saying, 'Bear up—trust to time.' No, no; they're wrong. Mind it.
  6. (chiefly imperative) To pay attention or heed to so as to obey; hence to obey; to make sure, to take care (that). [from 17th c.]
    Mind you don't knock that glass over.
  7. (now rare except in phrases) To pay attention to, in the sense of occupying one's mind with, to heed. [from 15th c.]
    You should mind your own business.
    • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew, Act I Scene i:
      My lord, you nod: you do not mind the play.
    • 1712, Joseph Addison, Spectator, No. 383 (May 20, 1710:
      Upon my coming down, I found all the Children of the Family got about my old Friend, and my Landlady herself, who is a notable prating Gossip, engaged in a Conference with him; being mightily pleased with his stroaking her little Boy upon the Head, and bidding him be a good Child and mind his Book.
    • 2000, George RR Martin, A Storm of Swords, Bantam 2011, page 84:
      Should you ever have a son, Sansa, beat him frequently so he learns to mind you.
  8. To look after, to take care of, especially for a short period of time. [from 17th c.]
    Would you mind my bag for me?
  9. To be careful about. [from 18th c.]
    • 2005, Gillie Bolton, Reflective Practice: Writing And Professional Development, →ISBN, page xv:
      Bank Underground Station, London, is built on a curve, leaving a potentially dangerous gap between platform and carriage to trap the unwary. The loudspeaker voice instructs passengers to "Mind the gap": the boundary between train and platform.
  10. (now obsolete outside dialect) To purpose, intend, plan.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 3, Act IV, sc. 1
      I mind to tell him plainly what I think.
    • 1885, Richard F. Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night:
      [] and if ever I refused to do his bidding or loitered or took my leisure he beat me with his feet more grievously than if I had been beaten with whips. He ceased not to signal with his hand wherever he was minded to go; so I carried him about the island, like a captive slave, and he bepissed and conskited my shoulders and back, dismounting not night nor day; and whenas he wished to sleep he wound his legs about his neck and leaned back and slept awhile, then arose and beat me; whereupon I sprang up in haste, unable to gainsay him because of the pain he inflicted on me.
  11. (Britain, Ireland) Take note; used to point out an exception or caveat.
    I'm not very healthy. I do eat fruit sometimes, mind.
  12. (originally and chiefly in negative or interrogative constructions) To dislike, to object to; to be bothered by. [from 16th c.]
    I wouldn't mind an ice cream right now.
    Do you mind if I smoke?

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Compound words derived from mind (verb)
Expressions derived from mind (verb)

DescendantsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


ChineseEdit

Alternate formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English mind. (Bolton & Hutton, 2005)

PronunciationEdit


VerbEdit

mind

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese slang) to mind, care about, object to

DanishEdit

VerbEdit

mind

  1. imperative of minde

EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronounEdit

mind

  1. partitive singular of mina

HungarianEdit

Table of Correlatives (cf. H. demonstrative adverbs)
question same every-/all no- relative some any else
this that ugyan mind(en)- se(m/n)- a- + qu. vala  akár
bár
más
who ki ő u mindenki senki aki v a b m
what mi ez az u u minden semmi ami/amely v a b m
which melyik mindegyik
mind
semelyik
egyik sem
amelyik v a b m
how hogy(an)
miként
így úgy u u mindenhogy
mindenhogyan
sehogy(an)
semmiképpen
ahogy/mint
ahogyan
v
v
a b
a b
m/m
m/m
whatlike
what kind
milyen
miféle
ilyen
efféle
olyan
afféle
u u mindenféle semmilyen
semmiféle
amilyen v
v
a b
a b
m
m/m
where hol itt ott u u mindenhol
mindenütt
sehol ahol v a b m
m
from wh. honnan innen onnan u u mindenhonnan sehonnan ahonnan v a b m
to where hova
hová
ide oda u u mindenhova
mindenhová
sehova
sehová
ahova
ahová
v
v
a b
a b
m
m
from
which way
merről erről arról u u mindenfelől semerről amerről v a b m
which way merre erre arra u u mindenfelé semerre amerre v a b m
why miért ezért azért u u mindenért semmiért amiért v a b m
how many hány ennyi annyi u u mind
az összes
sehány ahány v a b
how much mennyi semennyi amennyi v a b
what extent mennyire ennyire annyira u u (teljesen) semennyire amennyire v a b
what size mekkora ekkora akkora u u (az egész) semekkora amekkora v a b
what time mikor ekkor akkor u u mindig soha/sose(m)
sohase(m)
amikor v a b m
how long
how far
meddig eddig addig u u (végig)* semeddig ameddig v a b
*: Mindeddig/-addig mean “up until this/that point” (= egészen eddig/addig).
Csak following relative pronouns expresses “-ever”, e.g. aki csak (whoever);
is after “any” pronouns emphasizes “no matter”: akármit is (no matter what).

EtymologyEdit

Presumably from mi? (what?).[1]

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

mind

  1. all of it, all of them, each of them (grammatically singular)
    Synonyms: mindegyikük, mindegyik, az összes
    Mind(et) megettem.I ate all of it.
    A fogaim nem jók, de még mind megvan.My teeth are not perfect, but I still have all of them.

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in -e-, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative mind
accusative mindet
dative mindnek
instrumental minddel
causal-final mindért
translative minddé
terminative mindig
essive-formal mindként
essive-modal
inessive mindben
superessive minden
adessive mindnél
illative mindbe
sublative mindre
allative mindhez
elative mindből
delative mindről
ablative mindtől
non-attributive
possessive - singular
mindé
non-attributive
possessive - plural
mindéi

AdverbEdit

mind (not comparable)

  1. with everyone, all (usually of persons)
    Synonyms: mindnyájan, mindannyian
    Mind összegyűltek a ház előtt.They all gathered in front of the house.
  2. (formal) increasingly (used with comparative form)
    Synonym: egyre
    Mind nagyobb igény van erre a szolgáltatásra.There is more and more demand for this service.
  3. (up) until…, up to(used with -ig; not (until) sooner than a given point in time)
    Synonym: egészen
    mind a mai napig(up) to this (very) day
    (Note: Most other phrases with this meaning are written without a space: mindaddig, mindeddig, mindmáig, mindmostanáig, mindvégig)

Derived termsEdit

Compound words
Expressions

ConjunctionEdit

mind

  1. (formal) both... and..., as well as
    mind a magánéletben, mind a munkábanboth in private life and in work
    Synonym: is

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ mind in Zaicz, Gábor (ed.). Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN.  (See also its 2nd edition.)

Further readingEdit

  • (pronoun & adverb): mind in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • (conjunction): mind in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *mendus (mark, sign).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mind n (nominative plural mind)

  1. A symbol indicating honour or rank; a crown, insignia, emblem

InflectionEdit

Neuter u-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative mindN mindL mindL, minda
Vocative mindN mindL mind
Accusative mindN mindL mind
Genitive mindoH, mindaH mindoN, mindaN mindaeN
Dative mindL mindaib mindaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

DescendantsEdit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
mind
also mmind after a proclitic
mind
pronounced with /ṽ(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*mendu-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, pages 264-265

Further readingEdit


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English ġemynd, from Proto-Germanic *gamundiz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mind (plural minds)

  1. memory, recollection.
  2. mind.

VerbEdit

mind (third-person singular present minds, present participle mindin, past mindit, past participle mindit)

  1. To remember.
  2. To remind.
  3. To mind, care.