migraine

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

1777 re-spelling (following French) of late 14th century Middle English megrim, from 13th century Old French migraigne, from Vulgar Latin pronunciation of Late Latin hemicrania ‎(pain in one half of the head), from Ancient Greek ἡμικρανία ‎(hēmikranía), from ἡμι- ‎(hēmi-, hemi-, half) + κρανίον ‎(kraníon, skull) (whence also cranium)[1], from a literal translation of Egyptian gs-tp 'headache'[2] although the link between the Egyptian magical papyri and the Greek "ἡμικρανία" could be purely incidental.

Cognate to megrim, hemicrania.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

migraine ‎(plural migraines)

  1. (pathology) A severe, disabling headache, usually affecting only one side of the head, and often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, photophobia and visual disturbances.
    He had a headache so bad that he wished he was dead, but it was the sort of migraine that promised him he would continue to suffer but not die.
    After consuming too much coffee every day for six weeks, she got severe migraines that would last up until 47 minutes after her first cup of coffee.
    • 2006, Dian Caouette, Migraine Rewritten: A Journey from Debilitating Headache Pain to Regained Health, page 6,
      It was in 1976, during our first family holiday to Disneyland, California, that my family learned the difference between a headache and a migraine.
    • 2013, Susan Hutchinson, The Woman's Guide to Managing Migraine, page 18,
      A team of international researchers has recently identified the first—ever genetic link to common migraine (common migraine refers to migraine without aura, and it is the most common type of migraine that occurs).
    • 2013, Health Press Publishing, Natural Therapies and Prevention for Headaches and Migraines, unnumbered page,
      Migraine headaches are fortunately suffered by a relatively small percentage of people, but for those who do suffer, migraines can literally take over their life.
  2. (pathology) A neurological condition characterised by such headaches.
    • 1995, Robert A. Davidoff, Migraine: Manifestations, Pathogenesis, and Management, page 60,
      Syncope is is estimated to occur in bouts of headache in approximately 5% of adult patients with migraine.
    • 2005, Michael H. Silber, Chapter 28: Headaches and sleep disorders, Christian Guilleminault (editor), Clinical Neurophysiology of Sleep Disorders, page 337,
      Migraine is characterized by recurrent unilateral, often pulsating, headaches, worsened by physical activity and associated with nausea, photophobia and phonophobia.
    • 2006, Joshua W. Devine, Daily Migraine Prevention and Its Influence on Resource Utilization in the Military Health System, PhD Thesis, page 1,
      Migraine is a common and disabling neurological disorder with substantial variation in the frequency, severity, and duration of headaches (Goadsby, Lipton, & Ferrari, 2002).

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ migraine” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).
  2. ^ Borghouts, The magical texts of Papyrus Leiden I 348, 1971. p.9

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French migraine.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

migraine f ‎(plural migraines, diminutive migrainetje n)

  1. migraine

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin hemicrania, from Ancient Greek ἡμικρανία ‎(hēmikranía).

NounEdit

migraine f ‎(plural migraines)

  1. migraine

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit

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