EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the fusion of Middle English misbidden (to mistreat; equivalent to mis- +‎ bid) and Middle English misbeden (to mistreat; abuse; outrage; offend; insult), from Old English misbēodan (to ill-use, injure, do wrong to, announce wrongly), equivalent to mis- +‎ bid (to offer, declare).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

misbid (third-person singular simple present misbids, present participle misbidding, simple past misbid or misbad or misbade, past participle misbidden)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To injure; mistreat.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To insult; offend.
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To make an incorrect offer or bid.
    • 1988, Madeleine M. Leininger, Care, discovery and uses in clinical and community nursing:
      I did my bids for that month and I misbid, and I bid all weekends.
  4. (transitive, intransitive, card games) To bid incorrectly; bid higher or lower than actual.
    • 2004, Jim Priebe, Takeout Double: A Bridge Mystery:
      After apologizing profusely for his errors on the first two hands, he misbid the last hand and they ended up in fifth place.

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

misbid (plural misbids)

  1. An incorrect bid or offer.