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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

mis- +‎ use (noun)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

misuse (plural misuses)

  1. An incorrect, improper or unlawful use of something.
    • 2012 June 4, Lewis Smith, “Queen's English Society says enuf is enough, innit?”, in the Guardian[1]:
      The Queen may be celebrating her jubilee but the Queen's English Society, which has railed against the misuse and deterioration of the English language, is to fold.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

mis- +‎ use (verb)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

misuse (third-person singular simple present misuses, present participle misusing, simple past and past participle misused or (obsolete) misust)

  1. (transitive) To use (something) incorrectly. [from 14th c.]
  2. (transitive) To abuse or mistreat (something or someone). [from 14th c.]
  3. (transitive) To rape (a woman); later more generally, to sexually abuse (someone). [from 14th c.]
    • 2013, Philipp Meyer, The Son, Simon & Schuster 2014, p. 326:
      “If that is true she would be the first case I have ever heard of, as most female captives are misused by the entire tribe.”
  4. (obsolete, transitive) To abuse verbally, to insult. [16th-17th c.]
    • 1621, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy, Oxford: Printed by Iohn Lichfield and Iames Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 216894069; The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd corrected and augmented edition, Oxford: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, 1624, OCLC 54573970, (please specify |partition=1, 2, or 3):
      , II.3.7:
      Socrates was brought upon the stage by Aristophanes, and misused to his face: but he laughed, as if it concerned him not […].
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