EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English mōrn, morwen, from Old English morġen, from Proto-Germanic *murganaz, *murginaz (compare West Frisian moarn, Low German Morgen, Dutch morgen, German Morgen, Danish morgen, Norwegian morgon), from pre-Germanic *mr̥kéno, *mr̥kóno, from Proto-Indo-European *mr̥Hko (compare Welsh bore ‘morning’, Lithuanian mérkti ‘to blink, twinkle’, Skt márīcih ‘ray of light’), from *mer- ‘to shimmer, glisten’ (compare Greek μέρα (méra) ‘morning’). See also morrow, morning.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

morn (plural morns)

  1. (now poetic) Morning.
    • William Shakespeare, Hamlet, lines 165-168,
      But look, the morn, in russet mantle clad, / Walks o'er the dew of yon high eastward hill. / Break we our watch up, and by my advice, / Let us impart what we have seen tonight

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


NorwegianEdit

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

morn

  1. colloquial variant of god morgen

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old English morgen.

NounEdit

morn (plural morns)

  1. morning
  2. (definite singular) tomorrow
    A'll gae for ma messages the morn. I'll go shopping tomorrow.

SwedishEdit

InterjectionEdit

morn

  1. Colloquial variant of god morgon
Last modified on 16 April 2014, at 22:46