tomorrow

See also: to-morrow

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English tomorwe, tomorwen, from Old English tōmorgen, tō morgenne, tōmergen (tomorrow, adverb), from (at, on) + morgene, mergen (dative of morgen (morning)), from Proto-Germanic *murganaz (morning), perhaps, from Proto-Indo-European *mergʰ- (to blink, to twinkle), equivalent to to- +‎ morrow.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

tomorrow (not comparable)

  1. On the day after the present day.
    • 1855, Charles Dickens, The Holly-Tree
      It was eight o'clock to-morrow evening when I buckled up my travelling writing-desk in its leather case, paid my Bill, and got on my warm coats and wrappers.
  2. At some point in the future; later on
    If you don't get your life on track today, you're going to be very sorry tomorrow.
  3. (possibly obsolete) On next (period of time other than a day, such as a week or a month), following the present (period of time).
    • 1664 March 28, debate in Great Britain's House of Commons, printed in 1803 in the Journals of the House of Commons, page 538:
      Resolved, &c. That the House be Called over again on Tomorrow Month, being the Six-and-twentieth Day of April next.
    • 1840, Melancholy Death of Amelia V, in The Christian Guardian (and Church of England magazine), page 60:
      'You shall go to it on to-morrow week, so make haste and get well!'
  4. (obsolete) On the next day (following some date in the past).
    • 1717 October 8, Robert Wodrow, in a letter to Mr. James Hart, printed in 1828, Robert Wodrow, The History of the Sufferings of the Church of Scotland, page xxii:
      To prevent this, a committee for peace was proposed for to-morrow, who heard the ministers and Mr. Anderson upon the heads of the affair, but in vain; when their complaint was given in in Synod, and referred to the next Synod []
    • 1817, James Kirkton, The Secret and True History of the Church of Scotland, page 126:
      [] after he hade drunk liberally in the Advocate's house that same day, went to bed in health, but was taken up stark dead to-morrow morning; and such was the testimony of honour heaven was pleased to allow Montrose's pompuous funerals.

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

tomorrow (plural tomorrows)

  1. The day after the present day.
    Tomorrow will be sunny.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Terms derived from tomorrow (noun)

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

AdverbEdit

tomorrow

  1. Alternative form of tomorwe

NounEdit

tomorrow (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of tomorwe