See also: Norm and NORM

English edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From French norme, from Old French, from Latin norma (a carpenter's square, a rule, a pattern, a precept).

Noun edit

norm (plural norms)

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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  1. That which is normal or typical.
    Unemployment is the norm in this part of the country.
    • 2008, Dennis Patterson, Ari Afilalo, The New Global Trading Order: The Evolving State and the Future of Trade:
      [] the world needs a constitutional moment that will generate new institutions and actuate a new norm.
    • 2011 December 16, Denis Campbell, “Hospital staff 'lack skills to cope with dementia patients'”, in Guardian[1]:
      "This shocking report proves once again that we urgently need a radical shake-up of hospital care," said Jeremy Hughes, chief executive of the Alzheimer's Society. "Given that people with dementia occupy a quarter of hospital beds and that many leave in worse health than when they were admitted, it is unacceptable that training in dementia care is not the norm."
    • 2019 December 18, Richard Clinnick, “Railway's 2020 vision”, in Rail, page 3:
      Projects such as the King's Cross refurbishment, Waterloo blockade, Scottish electrification and the Borders show that the industry can do wonderful work - but that must become the norm, not the exception.
  2. A rule that is imposed by regulations and/or socially enforced by members of a community.
    Not eating your children is just one of those societal norms.
    • 2011, Roy F. Baumeister, John Tierney, Willpower, →ISBN, page 230:
      Peer pressure helps explain why people in Europe weigh less than Americans: They follow different social norms, like eating only at mealtimes instead of snacking throughout the day.
  3. (philosophy, computer science) A sentence with non-descriptive meaning, such as a command, permission, or prohibition.
  4. (mathematics) A function, generally denoted   or  , that maps vectors to non-negative scalars and has the following properties:
    1. if   then  ;
    2. given a scalar  ,  , where   is the absolute value of  ;
    3. given two vectors  ,   (the triangle inequality).
  5. (chess) A high level of performance in a chess tournament, several of which are required for a player to receive a title.
Hyponyms edit
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

Back-formation from normed.

Verb edit

norm (third-person singular simple present norms, present participle norming, simple past and past participle normed)

  1. (mathematical analysis) To endow (a vector space, etc.) with a norm.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit
See also edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Danish edit

Etymology edit

From Latin norma.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

norm c (singular definite normen, plural indefinite normer)

  1. norm; standard

Declension edit

References edit

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French norme, ultimately from Latin nōrma. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

norm f (plural normen, diminutive normpje n)

  1. A norm, standard.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Norwegian Bokmål edit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology edit

From Latin norma.

Noun edit

norm m (definite singular normen, indefinite plural normer, definite plural normene)

  1. norm (that which is normal)

Derived terms edit

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology edit

From Latin norma.

Noun edit

norm f (definite singular norma, indefinite plural normer, definite plural normene)

  1. A norm (that which is normal).

Derived terms edit

References edit

Swedish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Noun edit

norm c

  1. norm (that which is normal)
  2. norm (in analysis)

Declension edit

Declension of norm 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative norm normen normer normerna
Genitive norms normens normers normernas

Related terms edit

Anagrams edit

Veps edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Finnic *nurmi, from Proto-Finno-Ugric *ńurme. Cognates include Finnish nurmi.

Noun edit

norm

  1. lawn
  2. meadow

Declension edit

Inflection of norm (inflection type 3/kivi)
nominative sing. norm
genitive sing. normen
partitive sing. normed
partitive plur. normid
singular plural
nominative norm normed
accusative normen normed
genitive normen normiden
partitive normed normid
essive-instructive normen normin
translative normeks normikš
inessive normes normiš
elative normespäi normišpäi
illative normehe normihe
adessive normel normil
ablative normelpäi normilpäi
allative normele normile
abessive normeta normita
comitative normenke normidenke
prolative normedme normidme
approximative I normenno normidenno
approximative II normennoks normidennoks
egressive normennopäi normidennopäi
terminative I normehesai normihesai
terminative II normelesai normilesai
terminative III normessai
additive I normehepäi normihepäi
additive II normelepäi normilepäi