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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English nam, naam, from Old English nām (seizure of property), probably from Old Norse nám (occupation; acquisition, learning, study, literally taking), from Proto-Germanic *nēmō (taking), from Proto-Germanic *nemaną (to take), probably from Proto-Indo-European *nem- (to take). Cognate with Old English nǣm (taking, acceptance), Old High German nāma ("seizure, confiscation"; > German Nahme).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

naam (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete, law) The taking of property for the purpose of compensation.
  2. (obsolete, law) Goods taken in such a manner.

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch naam, from Middle Dutch name, from Old Dutch namo, from Proto-Germanic *namô, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁nómn̥.

NounEdit

naam (plural name)

  1. name

Derived termsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch name, from Old Dutch namo, from Proto-Germanic *namô, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁nómn̥. Compare German Name, West Frisian namme, English name, Danish navn.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /naːm/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: naam
  • Rhymes: -aːm

NounEdit

naam m (plural namen, diminutive naampje n)

  1. name

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: naam

AnagramsEdit


Fiji HindiEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Hindi नाम (nām).

PronounEdit

naam

  1. name

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

naam m (plural naams)

  1. naan (bread)

SwahiliEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic نَعَمْ(naʿam).

InterjectionEdit

naam

  1. yes; certainly

See alsoEdit