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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

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AdjectiveEdit

no more (not comparable)

  1. (idiomatic) not any more, no further
  2. (idiomatic) dead

AdverbEdit

no more (not comparable)

  1. (idiomatic) no longer, not any more
    • 1917, Neil Munro, Lochaber No More
      Farewell to Lochaber, farewell to the glen,
      No more will he wander Lochaber again.
    • 1817, Lord Byron
      So, we'll go no more a roving
    • 1623, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Titus Andronicus
      If thou wilt not, befall what may befall,
      I'll speak no more,—but vengeance rot you all!
    • 1973. Emil Cioran, translated by Richard Howard, The Trouble With Being Born
      I think of so many people who are no more, and I pity them. Yet they are not so much to be pitied, for they have solved every problem, beginning with the problem of death.

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InterjectionEdit

no more

  1. Stop it! Don't continue!
    • 2009, C. Leslie Bradley, In Her Dreams
      The police officer started with another round of questions. “Please, no more. I can't do this anymore.” Janette lay her head down on the kitchen table and cried.

NounEdit

no more (plural no mores)

  1. (idiomatic, rare) Something that is from a certain point onwards forbidden, or non-existent
    • 2013, Charles K. Stanley, What No Eye Has Seen
      So even becoming a doctor created a no more for him — no more guitar playing!
    • 2014, Buddy Rogers, The Pain from the Death of a Spouse
      We didn't like to find the areas where we did not see eye-to-eye because they generated their own list of no mores and made us uncomfortable with each other.

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