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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French osier (basket willow, withy), from Old French osier, hosier, hosyere (compare Medieval Latin ausēria (willow-bed)), from Frankish *halster (compare Low German Halster, Hilster (bay willow)). Alternatively from Medieval Latin ausēria (willow-bed), from Gaulish *awesā (riverbed) (compare Breton aoz (riverbed)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

osier (plural osiers)

  1. A kind of willow, Salix viminalis, growing in wet places in Europe and Asia, and introduced into North America. It is considered the best of the willows for basket work. The name is sometimes given to any kind of willow.
  2. One of the long, pliable twigs of this plant, or of other similar plants.
    • 1952, L.F. Salzman, Building in England, p. 188:
      Wattling consists of a row of upright stakes the spaces between which are more or less filled by interweaving small branches, hazel rods, osiers, reeds, thin strips of wood, or other pliant material.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French osier, hosier, hosyere (compare Medieval Latin ausēria (willow-bed)), from Frankish *halster (compare Low German Halster, Hilster (bay willow)). Alternatively from Medieval Latin ausēria (willow-bed), from Gaulish *awesā (riverbed) (compare Breton aoz (riverbed)).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /o.zje/
  • (file)

NounEdit

osier m (plural osiers)

  1. (countable) osier (tree)
  2. (uncountable) wicker
  3. (tree) willow

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit