See also: Gad, GAD, and gàd

English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Euphemistic alteration of God.

Interjection

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gad

  1. An exclamation roughly equivalent to by God, goodness gracious, for goodness' sake.
    • 1905, Edith Wharton, chapter 13, in The House of Mirth:
      That's the trouble — it was too easy for you — you got reckless — thought you could turn me inside out, and chuck me in the gutter like an empty purse. But, by gad, that ain't playing fair: that's dodging the rules of the game.
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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From Middle English gadden (to hurry, to rush about).

Verb

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gad (third-person singular simple present gads, present participle gadding, simple past and past participle gadded)

  1. (intransitive) To move from one location to another in an apparently random and frivolous manner.
    Synonym: gallivant
    • 1852, Alice Cary, Clovernook ....[1]:
      This, I suppose, is the virgin who abideth still in the house with you. She is not given, I hope, to gadding overmuch, nor to vain and foolish decorations of her person with ear-rings and finger-rings, and crisping-pins: for such are unprofitable, yea, abominable.
    • 1903, Howard Pyle, The Story of King Arthur and His Knights, Part III, Chapter Fourth, page 123
      So when he saw King Arthur he said: "Thou knave! Wherefore didst thou quit thy work to go a-gadding?"
    • 1888–1891, Herman Melville, “[Billy Budd, Foretopman.] Chapter [HTTP://GUTENBERG.NET.AU/EBOOKS06/0608511H.HTML 19].”, in Billy Budd and Other Stories, London: John Lehmann, published 1951, →OCLC:
      But there is no telling the sacrament, seldom if in any case revealed to the gadding world, wherever under circumstances at all akin to those here attempted to be set forth, two of great Nature's nobler order embrace.
    • 1960, P[elham] G[renville] Wodehouse, chapter XIII, in Jeeves in the Offing, London: Herbert Jenkins, →OCLC:
      If you are on the board of governors of a school and have contracted to supply an orator for the great day of the year, you can be forgiven for feeling a trifle jumpy when you learn that the silver-tongued one has gadded off to the metropolis, leaving no word as to when he will be returning, if ever.
  2. (of cattle) To run with the tail in the air, bent over the back, usually in an attempt to escape the warble fly.
Derived terms
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Translations
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Noun

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gad (plural gads)

  1. One who roams about idly; a gadabout.

Etymology 3

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From Middle English gade (a fool, simpleton, rascal, scoundrel; bastard), from Old English gada (fellow, companion, comrade, associate), from Proto-West Germanic *gadō, from Proto-Germanic *gadô, *gagadô (companion, associate), related to Proto-West Germanic *gaduling (kinsman). Cognate with Dutch gade (spouse), German Gatte (male spouse, husband). See also gadling.

Alternative forms

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Noun

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gad (plural gads)

  1. (Northern England, Scotland, derogatory) A greedy and/or stupid person.
    Get over here, ye good-for-nothing gadǃ
    • 1913, George Gordon, The Auld Clay Biggin:
      Ye greedy ged, ye have taken the very breath out o' me.

References

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Etymology 4

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From Middle English gad, gadde, borrowed from Old Norse gaddr (goad, spike), from Proto-Germanic *gazdaz (spike, rod, stake).

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Noun

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gad (plural gads)

  1. (especially UK, US, dialect) A goad, a sharp-pointed rod for driving cattle, horses, etc, or one with a whip or thong on the end for the same purpose.
    Hyponym: goad
    • 1684, Meriton, Praise Ale, l. 100, in 1851, James Orchard Halliwell-Phillipps, The Yorkshire Anthology: A Collection of Ancient and Modern Ballads, Poems and Songs, Relating to the County of Yorkshire, page 71:
      Ist yoakes and bowes and gad and yoaksticks there?
    • c. 1844, Prairie Farmer:
      Does your cow kick? Do not fly into a passion and pound her with a handspike, or trim her with a gad or a cow-hide.
    • 1885 December 17, Detroit Free Press[2]:
      Twain finds his voice after a short search for it and when he impels it forward it is a good, strong, steady voice in harness until the driver becomes absent-minded, when it stops to rest, and then the gad must be used to drive it on again.
    • 1888, “Robin Spraggon's Auld Grey Mare”, in The Monthly Chronicle of North-country Lore and Legend, page 171:
      Our thrifty dame, Mally, she rises soon at morn, She goes and tells the master I'm pulling up the corn; He clicks up the oxen gad and sair belabours me, For I'm Robin Spraggon's auld grey mare, ae how he's guided me!
    • 1908, Folklore Society (Great Britain), Publications, page 288:
      On the morning of Palm-Sunday, the gamekeeper, some servant on the estate, brings with him a large gad or whip, with a long thong; the stock is made of the mountain ash, []
  2. (UK, US, dialect) A rod or stick, such as a fishing rod or a measuring rod.
    • 1836, A Collection of Right Merrie Garlands for North Country Anglers, page 4:
      And we'll prepare our limber gads,
      Lang lines, and braw brass wheels;
    • 1876, Armstrong, Wanny Blossoms, page 33:
      Seek out thy tackle, thy creel and thy gad.
    • 1879, William Henderson, Folklore Society (Great Britain), Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders:
      Woe to the lad / without a rowen-tree gad.
    • 1896, Proudlock, Borderland Muse, page 268:
      We'll splice oor gads nigh Barra Mill, Beneath yon auld birk tree.
  3. (especially mining) A pointed metal tool for breaking or chiselling rock.
    • c. 1588–1593 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The Lamentable Tragedy of Titus Andronicus”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act IV, scene i]:
      I will go get a leaf of brass, / And with a gad of steel will write these words.
    • 2006, Thomas Pynchon, Against the Day, Vintage, published 2007, page 327:
      Frank was able to keep his eyes open long enough to check his bed with a miner's gad and douse the electric lamp
  4. (obsolete) A metal bar.
    • 1485, Thomas Malory, Le Morte d'Arthur, Book XV:
      they sette uppon hym and drew oute their swerdys to have slayne hym – but there wolde no swerde byghte on hym more than uppon a gadde of steele, for the Hyghe Lorde which he served, He hym preserved.
    • 1677–1683, Joseph Moxon, “(please specify the page)”, in Mechanick Exercises, or The Doctrine of Handy-Works, [], volumes (please specify |volume=I or II), London: [] Joseph Moxon, published 1678–1683, →OCLC:
      Flemish steel [] some in bars and some in gads.
    • 1836, Walter Scott, Guy Mannering, Or, The Astrologer: With the Author's Last Notes and Additions, page 372:
      When a man received sentence of death, he was put upon the gad as it was called, that is, secured to the bar of iron in the manner mentioned in the text. The practice subsisted in Edinburgh []
  5. (dated, metallurgy) An indeterminate measure of metal produced by a furnace, sometimes equivalent to a bloom weighing around 100 pounds.
    • 1957, H.R. Schubert, History of the British Iron and Steel Industry, page 146:
      Twice a day a 'gad' of iron, i.e., a bloom weighing 1 cwt. was produced, which took from six to seven hours.
  6. A spike on a gauntlet; a gadling.
    Synonyms: gadling, spike
    • 1840, Charles Henry Hartshorne, An Endeavor to Classify the Sepulchral Remains in Northamptonshire, Or, a Discourse on Funeral Monuments in that County: Delivered Before the Members of the Religious and Useful Knowledge Society, at Northampton, page 35:
      Sometimes we see the knuckles ornamented with gads or gadlings.
    • 1842, Ecclesiological Society, Illustrations of Monumental Brasses ..., page 70:
      His gauntlets have embroidered cuffs; there are gads or gadlings on the fingers.
    • 1858, Edward Cave, The Gentleman's Magazine: Or, Monthly Intelligencer: Volume the first [-fifth], for the year 1731 [-1735] ..., page 215:
      Another curious device was that of arming the knuckles of the gauntlets with spikes (gads or gadlings), by which they became weapons as well as defences.
    • 1992, Sir Guy Francis Laking, A Record of European Armour and Arms Through Seven Centuries, page 214:
      On both finger joints are gads, which are beautifully faceted and brought to a point.
Derived terms
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Translations
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See also

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Anagrams

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Afar

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈɡad/, [ˈɡʌd]
  • Hyphenation: gad

Noun

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gád m (plural gadoowá f or gaditté f or gadoodá f)

  1. song
  2. sung poetry

Declension

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Declension of gád
absolutive gád
predicative gáda
subjective gád
genitive gaddí
Postpositioned forms
l-case gádal
k-case gádak
t-case gádat
h-case gádah

References

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  • E. M. Parker, R. J. Hayward (1985) “gad”, in An Afar-English-French dictionary (with Grammatical Notes in English), University of London, →ISBN
  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[3], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis)

Danish

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [ˈɡ̊æˀð], [ˈɡ̊æðˀ]

Verb

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gad

  1. past of gide

Irish

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Old Irish gat,[3] from Proto-Celtic *gazdos, from late Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰasdʰos (branch ~ spear, sharp spine), a root also connected to Proto-Germanic *gazdaz (spike), Latin hasta (spear).

Noun

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gad m (genitive singular gaid, nominative plural gaid)

  1. withe
  2. string, rope, band
  3. Obsolete spelling of goid.
  4. Obsolete spelling of cad.
Declension
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Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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From Old Irish gataid (to take away).[4]

Verb

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gad (present analytic gadann, future analytic gadfaidh, verbal noun gad, past participle gadta)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, literary) take away, remove; snatch, carry off
  2. Alternative form of goid
Conjugation
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Mutation

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Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
gad ghad ngad
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References

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  1. ^ Finck, F. N. (1899) Die araner mundart (in German), volume II, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, page 120
  2. ^ Quiggin, E. C. (1906) A Dialect of Donegal, Cambridge University Press, § 125, page 48
  3. ^ Gregory Toner, Sharon Arbuthnot, Máire Ní Mhaonaigh, Marie-Luise Theuerkauf, Dagmar Wodtko, editors (2019), “gat”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  4. ^ Gregory Toner, Sharon Arbuthnot, Máire Ní Mhaonaigh, Marie-Luise Theuerkauf, Dagmar Wodtko, editors (2019), “gataid”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Further reading

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Lower Sorbian

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Etymology

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From Proto-Slavic *gadъ (serpent).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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gad m animal

  1. (archaic) venomous snake, viper, adder

Declension

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Noun

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gad m inan

  1. poison, venom

Declension

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Further reading

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  • Muka, Arnošt (1921, 1928) “gad”, in Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow (in German), St. Petersburg, Prague: ОРЯС РАН, ČAVU; Reprinted Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag, 2008
  • Starosta, Manfred (1999) “gad”, in Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch (in German), Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag
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Navajo Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nv

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /kàt/, [kàt], [kɣàt]

Noun

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gad

  1. juniper, cedar (especially Juniperus deppeana)

Polish

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Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology

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Inherited from Proto-Slavic *gadъ.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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gad m animal

  1. reptile (cold-blooded vertebrate of the class Reptilia)

Declension

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Derived terms

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adjective

Noun

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gad m pers

  1. scoundrel (villain)

Declension

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Further reading

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  • gad in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • gad in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Scots

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Etymology 1

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Unknown. Possibly from gaud (a bar of iron; a rod). Alternatively, compare Icelandic gaddr (packed snow). Attested from the 19th century.[1]

Noun

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gad (plural gads)

  1. a mass of ice

Etymology 2

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Unknown. Attested from the 20th century.[2] Compare caddle, cad (stones used to play the game of cherry pit). Compare also Scottish Gaelic gad (a twig, stick).

Noun

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gad (plural gads)

  1. a ball of wood or cork used to play shinty

See also

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References

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  1. ^ gad, n.1” in the Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries.
  2. ^ gad, n.2” in the Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries.

Scottish Gaelic

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Etymology 1

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Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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gad

  1. you (informal singular, direct object)
    Bruidhinn nas labhaire, chan eil mi gad chluinntinn ceart.Speak louder, I don't hear you well.
Usage notes
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Etymology 2

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From Old Irish gat, from Proto-Celtic *gazdo-, from late Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰasto- or *ǵʰasdʰo- (branch ~ spear, sharp spine), a root also connected to Proto-Germanic *gazdaz (spike), Latin hasta (spear).

Noun

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gad m (genitive singular gaid, plural gaid or gadan)

  1. withy, withe

Etymology 3

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Conjunction

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gad

  1. Alternative form of ged

Mutation

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Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
gad ghad
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Serbo-Croatian

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Etymology

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Inherited from Proto-Slavic *gadъ.

Noun

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gȁd m (Cyrillic spelling га̏д)

  1. a repulsive person
  2. scoundrel
  3. cad
  4. asshole
  5. snake; lizard

Declension

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Somali

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Verb

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gad

  1. to buy

Torres Strait Creole

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Noun

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gad

  1. (eastern dialect) an immature coconut

Usage notes

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Gad or smol koknat is the third stage of coconut growth. It is preceded by giru (eastern dialect) or musu koknat (western dialect), and followed by kopespes.

Veps

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Russian гад (gad).

Noun

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gad

  1. snake

Inflection

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Inflection of gad (inflection type 5/sana)
nominative sing. gad
genitive sing. gadan
partitive sing. gadad
partitive plur. gadoid
singular plural
nominative gad gadad
accusative gadan gadad
genitive gadan gadoiden
partitive gadad gadoid
essive-instructive gadan gadoin
translative gadaks gadoikš
inessive gadas gadoiš
elative gadaspäi gadoišpäi
illative gadaha gadoihe
adessive gadal gadoil
ablative gadalpäi gadoilpäi
allative gadale gadoile
abessive gadata gadoita
comitative gadanke gadoidenke
prolative gadadme gadoidme
approximative I gadanno gadoidenno
approximative II gadannoks gadoidennoks
egressive gadannopäi gadoidennopäi
terminative I gadahasai gadoihesai
terminative II gadalesai gadoilesai
terminative III gadassai
additive I gadahapäi gadoihepäi
additive II gadalepäi gadoilepäi

Volapük

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Noun

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gad (nominative plural gads)

  1. garden

Declension

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Derived terms

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Welsh

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Noun

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gad

  1. Soft mutation of cad.

Mutation

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Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cad gad nghad chad
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Etymology 2

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Alternative forms

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Verb

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gad

  1. (literary) second-person singular imperative of gadael

Mutation

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Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
gad ad ngad unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Western Apache

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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gad

  1. cedar or juniper tree, especially Juniperus deppeana.

References

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