French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Middle French seoir, from Old French seoir, from earlier sedeir, from Latin sedēre, from Proto-Italic *sedēō, from Proto-Indo-European *sed-.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

seoir (defective)

  1. (literary) to be suitable for; to be proper for
    • 1640, Pierre Corneille, Horace, act I, scene I:
      L’ébranlement sied bien aux plus fermes courages
      To waver is fitting for those of firmest courage
  2. (law) to be situated
  3. (archaic) sit down (see also s’asseoir)

Conjugation edit

This is a defective verb, only conjugated in the third person.

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Middle French edit

Etymology edit

From Old French seoir, from earlier sedeir, from Latin sedēre, present active infinitive of sedeō.

Verb edit

seoir

  1. to be; to be situated
    • c. 1369, Jean Froissart, Chroniques:
      Vous devés savoir que assés près de la ou ils estoient, siet la ville de Iuberot
      You should know that quite close to there where they were, is the city of Juberot
  2. (reflexive, se seoir) to sit down (be sitting)

Old French edit

Etymology edit

From an earlier sedeir, from Latin sedēre.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

seoir

  1. (transitive) to sit (make someone sit)
  2. (reflexive, se seoir) to sit down

Conjugation edit

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. This verb has a stressed present stem sie distinct from the unstressed stem se, as well as other irregularities. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Descendants edit

  • Middle French: seoir