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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

1880, from the phrase over the side (of a ship), equivalent to over +‎ side.

AdjectiveEdit

overside (comparative more overside, superlative most overside)

  1. located or positioned over the side, especially of a ship
    overside cargo
  2. being on the opposite side
    I seldom listen to the overside songs of this record.

AdverbEdit

overside (comparative more overside, superlative most overside)

  1. over the side
    The cargo was dumped overside by the crew.

Etymology 2Edit

From over- +‎ side.

NounEdit

overside (plural oversides)

  1. The side facing up or positioned above; the topside; surface.
    • 1882, English mechanic and world of science: Volume 34 - Page 547:
      [...] that is, glued to the underside of one card and the overside of the next, thus keeping their edges close and parallel to each other, [...]
    • 1981, Berit Wells, Opuscula Romana XIII: Volume 13:
      While the overside of the tiles was well smoothed, the underside was in general left crude and rough.
    • 1999, Pynchon notes: Issues 40-41:
      This chapter contains some of the most humorous writing on the overside of the narrative, and the most serious on the underside.
  2. The reverse or opposite side (of something).
    the overside of the record
AntonymsEdit

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From over- +‎ side

NounEdit

overside f or m (definite singular oversida or oversiden, indefinite plural oversider, definite plural oversidene)

  1. upper side, topside

AntonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From over- +‎ side

NounEdit

overside f (definite singular oversida, indefinite plural oversider, definite plural oversidene)

  1. upper side, topside

AntonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit