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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From owl +‎ -let. Compare howlet.

NounEdit

owlet (plural owlets)

  1. diminutive of owl
    • 1595, George Peele, The Old Wives’ Tale, The Malone Society Reprints, 1908, lines 51-54,[1]
      And in faith Sir unlesse your hospitalitie doe releeve us, wee are like to wander with a sorrowfull hey ho, among the owlets, & Hobgoblins of the Forrest []
    • c. 1605, William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act IV, Scene 1,[2]
      Adder’s fork and blind-worm’s sting,
      Lizard’s leg and owlet’s wing,
      For a charm of powerful trouble,
      Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.
    • 1798, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Fears in Solitude, London: J. Johnson, pp. 4-5,[3]
      [] and bold with joy,
      Forth from his dark and lonely hiding-place
      (Portentous sight) the owlet, ATHEISM,
      Sailing on obscene wings athwart the noon,
      Drops his blue-fringed lids, and holds them close,
      And, hooting at the glorious sun in heaven,
      Cries out, “where is it?”
  2. A young owl; owling.
  3. One of a species of small owls, as
    1. Athene noctua

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