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See also: OWL

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EnglishEdit

 
A northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English owle, from Old English ūle, from Proto-Germanic *uwwalǭ (compare West Frisian ûle, Dutch uil, Danish and Norwegian ugle, German Eule), diminutive of *uwwǭ (eagle-owl) (compare German Uhu), of imitative origin or a variant of *ūfaz, *ūfǭ (compare Swedish uv (horned owl), Bavarian Auf),[1] from Proto-Indo-European *up- (compare Latvian ũpis (eagle-owl), Czech úpět (to wail, howl), Avestan 𐬎𐬟𐬌𐬌𐬈𐬌𐬨𐬌 (ufiieimi, to call out) ‘’)[2].[3]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

owl (plural owls)

  1. Any of various birds of prey of the order Strigiformes that are primarily nocturnal and have forward-looking, binocular vision, limited eye movement, and good hearing. [from 8th c.]
  2. (by extension) A person seen as having owl-like characteristics, especially appearing wise or serious, or being nocturnally active. [from 14th c.]
    Antonyms: lark
  3. The owl pigeon. [from 18th c.]

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Marlies Philippa et al, eds., Etymologisch Woordenboek van het Nederlands, A-Z, s.v. “uil” (Amsterdam UP, 3 Dec. 2009). [1]
  2. ^ Derksen, Rick (2008) Etymological Dictionary of the Slavic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 4), Leiden, Boston: Brill, ISBN 978 90 04 15504 6, pages 532—535
  3. ^ Vladimir Orel, A Handbook of Germanic Etymology, s.vv. “*uwwalōn”, “*uwwǭ”, “*ūfaz ~ *ūfǭ” (Leiden: Brill, 2003), 436.

AnagramsEdit