English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English connen, from Old English cunnan (to know, know how), from Proto-West Germanic *kunnan, from Proto-Germanic *kunnaną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵneh₃- (whence know). Doublet of can.

Verb edit

con (third-person singular simple present cons, present participle conning, simple past and past participle conned)

  1. (rare) To study or examine carefully, especially in order to gain knowledge of; to learn, or learn by heart.
    • 1599 (first performance), William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Iulius Cæsar”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act IV, scene iii], page 125, column 1:
      For Caſſius is a-weary of the World: / Hated by one he loues, brau'd by his Brother, / Check'd like a bondman, all his faults obſeru'd, / Set in a Note-booke, learn'd, and con'd by roate / To caſt into my Teeth.
    • 1815 [1802], William Wordsworth, Resolution and Independence:
      At length, himself unsettling, he the pond / Stirred with his staff, and fixedly did look / Upon the muddy water, which he conned, / As if he had been reading in a book
    • 1795, Edmund Burke, Letter to a Noble Lord on the Attacks Made upon him and his Pension, in the House of Lords, by the Duke of Bedford and the Earl of Lauderdale, Early in the Present Session of Parliament:
      I did not come into parliament to con my lesson. I had earned my pension before I set my foot in St. Stephen's chapel.
    • 1847 January – 1848 July, William Makepeace Thackeray, chapter 21, in Vanity Fair [], London: Bradbury and Evans [], published 1848, →OCLC:
      During these delectable entertainments, Miss Wirt and the chaperon sate by, and conned over the peerage, and talked about the nobility.
    • 1876 July, Henry James, Jr., “The American”, in The Atlantic Monthly: A Magazine of Literature, Science, Art, and Politics, volume XXXVIII, number CCXXV, Boston, Mass.: H[enry] O[scar] Houghton and Company; New York, N.Y.: Hurd and Houghton; Cambridge, Mass.: The Riverside Press, chapter IV, page 17, column 2:
      He read old almanacs at the book-stalls on the quays, and he began to frequent another café, where more newspapers were taken and his post-prandial demi-tasse cost him a penny extra, and where he used to con the tattered sheets for curious anecdotes, freaks of nature, and strange coincidences.
    • 1963, D'Arcy Niland, Dadda jumped over two elephants: short stories:
      The hawk rested on a crag of the gorge and conned the terrain with a fierce and frowning eye.
  2. (rare, obsolete) To know; understand; acknowledge.
    • 1579, Immeritô [pseudonym; Edmund Spenser], “Iune”, in The Shepheardes Calender: [], London: [] Hugh Singleton, [], →OCLC; reprinted as H[einrich] Oskar Sommer, editor, The Shepheardes Calender [], London: John C. Nimmo, [], 1890, →OCLC:
      Of Muses Hobbinol, I conne no skill
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Abbreviation of Latin contra (against).

Noun edit

con (plural cons)

  1. A disadvantage of something, especially when contrasted with its advantages (pros).
    pros and cons
Synonyms edit
Antonyms edit
Related terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 3 edit

Clipping of convict.

Noun edit

con (plural cons)

  1. (slang) A convicted criminal, a convict.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 4 edit

From con trick, shortened from confidence trick.

Noun edit

con (plural cons)

  1. (informal) A fraud; something carried out with the intention of deceiving, usually for personal, often illegal, gain.
    Synonyms: scam; see also Thesaurus:deception
    • 2021 February 23, Rafael Behr, “Brexit is a machine to generate perpetual grievance. It's doing its job perfectly”, in The Guardian[2]:
      Leavers will be attracted to that story because it spares them the discomfort of admitting that they voted for a con, and then made a prime minister of the con artist.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Verb edit

con (third-person singular simple present cons, present participle conning, simple past and past participle conned)

  1. (transitive, informal) To trick or defraud, usually for personal gain.
    Synonyms: (British, Australian) be sold a pup; see also Thesaurus:deceive
    • 2017 July 17, Martin Lukacs, “Neoliberalism has conned us into fighting climate change as individuals”, in The Guardian[3]:
      Neoliberalism has conned us into fighting climate change as individuals [title]
Translations edit

Related terms edit

Etymology 5 edit

From earlier cond; see conn.

Verb edit

con (third-person singular simple present cons, present participle conning, simple past and past participle conned)

  1. Alternative form of conn (direct a ship)

Noun edit

con (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of conn (navigational direction of a ship)
Derived terms edit

Etymology 6 edit

Clipping of convention or conference.

Noun edit

con (plural cons)

  1. (informal) An organized gathering, such as a convention, conference, or congress.
    • 1995 September 4, Lindsay Crawford, “Re: Intersection”, in rec.arts.sf.fandom[4] (Usenet), message-ID <9509042250393785@emerald.com>:
      I can't speak for Faye as ed of FHAPA, but it would be really swell of someone could send us a set of Intersection daily newszines, plus any con flyers or other fannish papers that were there to had for the picking up: fannish things, you know, not including media, gaming, filking or costuming, fine fun but not my cup of blog, thank you.
Derived terms edit

Etymology 7 edit

Clipping of conversion.

Noun edit

con (plural cons)

  1. (informal) The conversion of part of a building.
    We're getting a loft con done next year.

Etymology 8 edit

Clipping of consumption.

Noun edit

con (uncountable)

  1. (informal, obsolete) Consumption; pulmonary tuberculosis.

Etymology 9 edit

Origin uncertain. Perhaps a clipping of Middle English acquerne, aquerne, ocquerne, okerne (squirrel), from Old English ācweorna, āqueorna, āquorna, ācurna (squirrel), from Proto-West Germanic *aikwernō, from Proto-Germanic *aikwernô (squirrel); or from its Old Norse cognate íkorni (squirrel), from the same ultimate source. Cognate with West Frisian iikhoarn (squirrel), Dutch eekhoorn (squirrel), German Eichhorn (squirrel), Icelandic íkorni (squirrel).

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

con (plural cons)

  1. (zoology, dialectal or obsolete) Squirrel, particularly the red squirrel.
  2. (Northern England, obsolete) A squirrel's nest.

Etymology 10 edit

Clipping of conservative; compare lib.

Noun edit

con (plural cons)

  1. (abbreviation) A political conservative.
    own the cons
Derived terms edit

See also edit

English terms containing "con" etymologically unrelated to the above entries

Anagrams edit

Aragonese edit

Etymology edit

From Latin cum (with).

Preposition edit

con

  1. with

Asturian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin cum (with).

Preposition edit

con

  1. with

Derived terms edit

Catalan edit

 
Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin cōnus.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

con m (plural cons)

  1. cone

Related terms edit

Chinese edit

Etymology 1 edit

Clipping of English contact lens.

Pronunciation edit


Noun edit

con

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese) contact lens (Classifier: c;  c;  c)
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Clipping of happy corner, from English happy corner.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit


Noun edit

con

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese, chiefly school slang) happy corner

Verb edit

con

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese, chiefly school slang) to happy corner
    • 2004, “大學迎新出軌玩Con撞下體”, in 大學線[5]:
      調查顯示,有七成男生是在不情願的情況下被con的。另外,近四成受訪者表示即使「被con者」反抗,也不會停止con人。
      Survey has shown that 70% of males are happy cornered involuntarily. Also, nearly 40% of correspondents states that they would not happy cornering people, even when the one who is happy cornered is resisting.

Etymology 3 edit

Clipping of English concert.

Pronunciation edit


Noun edit

con

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese) concert (Classifier: c)
Synonyms edit

Etymology 4 edit

Clipping of English contest.

Pronunciation edit


Noun edit

con

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese, chiefly in compounds) contest
Derived terms edit

Etymology 5 edit

Clipping of English consultation or English consult.

Pronunciation edit


Verb edit

con

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese, university slang) to consult or to question a student society candidate before the election
Derived terms edit

Etymology 6 edit

Clipping of English contractor.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

con

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese) contractor
Derived terms edit

Etymology 7 edit

Clipping of English conference.

Pronunciation edit


Noun edit

con

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese, only in compounds) conference
Derived terms edit

Dalmatian edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin cum.

Preposition edit

con

  1. with

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin cunnus.

Noun edit

con m

  1. (vulgar) vulva, cunt

Fala edit

Alternative forms edit

  • cun (Lagarteiru, less common in Valverdeñu)

Etymology edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese con, from Latin cum, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm.

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

con

  1. (Mañegu, Valverdeñu) with
    Antonym: sin
    • 2000, Domingo Frades Gaspar, Vamus a falal: Notas pâ coñocel y platical en nosa fala, Editora regional da Extremadura, Chapter 2: Númerus:
      Cumu to é custión de proporciós, sin que sirva de argumentu por nun fel falta, poemus vel que en a misma Europa hai Estaus Soberarius con menus territoriu que os tres lugaris nossus, cumu:
      As everything is a matter of proportions, without its presence being an argument, we can see that even in Europe there are Sovereign States with less territory than our three places, such as:

References edit

  • Valeš, Miroslav (2021) Diccionariu de A Fala: lagarteiru, mañegu, valverdeñu (web)[6], 2nd edition, Minde, Portugal: CIDLeS, published 2022, →ISBN

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin cunnus, probably ultimately of Proto-Indo-European origin.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

con m (plural cons, feminine conne)

  1. (vulgar) cunt, pussy (the female genitalia)
  2. (vulgar) arsehole, asshole, fucktard, cunt, retard (stupid person)
    • 2021, Angèle, Plus de sens:
      Comme un con qui dit ce qu’il pense, [] rien n’a plus de sens.
      Like an asshole who says what he thinks, [...] nothing makes sense anymore.

Adjective edit

con (feminine conne, masculine plural cons, feminine plural connes)

  1. (slang, vulgar) stupid

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Galician edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese con, from Latin cum (with).

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

con

  1. with
    Antonym: sen
Derived terms edit

Conjunction edit

con

  1. and

Etymology 2 edit

 
Cons, Couso, Ribeira, Galicia
 
Boulder known as Con da Edra (Ivy's boulder)

Attested in local Medieval Latin documents as cauno, with a derived cauneto,[1] from Proto-Celtic *akaunon (stone),[2] from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éḱmō.[3] Unlikely from Latin cōnus, which should have originated a word with a closed stressed vowel.[4] Doublet of gouño.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

con m (plural cons)

  1. boulder, specially those found semi-submerged at the seashore
    Synonyms: laxe, petón
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

References edit

  • con” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.
  • caun” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2018.
  • con” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • con” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • con” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.
  1. ^ "cauneto" in Galleciae Monumenta Historica.
  2. ^ Joan Coromines; José A. Pascual (1983–1991), “con II”, in Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico (in Spanish), Madrid: Gredos
  3. ^ Cf. Xavier Delamarre (2003) Dictionnaire de la langue gauloise: Une approche linguistique du vieux-celtique continental, →ISBN, pages 30-31.
  4. ^ Joseph M. Piel (1953) Miscelânea de etimologia portuguesa a galega: primeira série[1], Coímbra: Universidade, page 99

Irish edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

con m sg

  1. genitive singular of

Mutation edit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
con chon gcon
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Italian edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin cum (with), from Proto-Italic *kom, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm (next to, at, with, along).

Preposition edit

con

  1. with, together
    Antonym: senza
  2. (rowing) coxed
Usage notes edit
  • When followed by the definite article, con may be combined with the article to produce the following combined forms (marking these combined forms in writing is old-fashioned, and very rarely used apart from col and coi; however, it has always been very common in speech, and it still is):
con + article Combined form
con + il col
con + lo collo
con + l' coll'
con + i coi
con + gli cogli
con + la colla
con + le colle

Etymology 2 edit

Alternative form of com, apocopic form of come, found before consonants other than ⟨b⟩, ⟨m⟩, ⟨p⟩.

Adverb edit

con (apocopated)

  1. (obsolete) Alternative form of com, Apocopic form of come
    • c. 13161321, Dante Alighieri, “Canto XXXI”, in Paradiso [Heaven]‎[7], lines 58–60; republished as Giorgio Petrocchi, editor, La Commedia secondo l'antica vulgata [The Commedia according to the ancient vulgate]‎[8], 2nd revised edition, Florence: publ. Le Lettere, 1994:
      Uno intendëa, e altro mi rispuose:
      credea veder Beatrice e vidi un sene
      vestito con le genti glorïose.
      One listened, and another one answered me; I thought I saw Beatrice, and I saw an old man, dressed like the [other] glorious people
Derived terms edit

References edit

  • con1 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana
  • con2 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Ladin edit

Alternative forms edit

  • cun (Gherdëina, Badia)

Etymology edit

From Latin cum (with).

Preposition edit

con

  1. with
    Antonyms: zenza, zënza

Ligurian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin cum.

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

con

  1. with
con + article Combined form
con + o co-o
con + a co-a
con + i co-i
con + e co-e

Middle Irish edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

con m

  1. genitive singular/dual/plural of

Mutation edit

Middle Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
con chon con
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Muong edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Vietic *kɔːn, from Proto-Mon-Khmer *kuun or *kuən. Cognates include Old Mon kon, Khmer កូន (koun), Bahnar kon, Vietnamese con.

Noun edit

con

  1. (Mường Bi) child

Classifier edit

con

  1. (Mường Bi) Indicates animals (including the human)

References edit

  • Hà Quang Phùng (2012 September 6) “Archived copy”, in Tìm hiểu về ngữ pháp tiếng Mường (Thim hiếu wuê ngử pháp thiểng Mường) [Understanding Muong grammar]‎[9] (FlashPaper; overall work in Vietnamese and Muong), Thanh Sơn–Phú Thọ Province Continuing Education Center, archived from the original on 19 September 2016

Old French edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin cunnus.

Noun edit

con oblique singularm (oblique plural cons, nominative singular cons, nominative plural con)

  1. (vulgar) cunt (human female genitalia)
Descendants edit
  • French: con
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

See conme.

Conjunction edit

con

  1. Alternative form of conme

Old Galician-Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin cum, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm.

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

con

  1. with

Descendants edit

  • Fala: con
  • Galician: con
  • Portuguese: com (see there for further descendants)

Old Irish edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

con m

  1. genitive singular/dual/plural of

Conjunction edit

con

  1. Alternative form of co (so that)
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 12c38
      con festar cách
      so that everyone may know

Mutation edit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
con chon con
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old Spanish edit

Etymology edit

From Latin cum.

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

con

  1. with
    • c. 1200, Cantar del Mio Cid:
      Çid, en el nuestro mal vos non ganades nada;
      mas ¡el Criador vos vala con todas sus vertudes sanctas!»
      Cid, from our ill you gain nothing;
      but may the Creator protect you with all his holy powers!

Descendants edit

Scottish Gaelic edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Celtic *kunom (compare Welsh cŵn, Cornish keun).

Noun edit

con m pl

  1. definite genitive plural of (dog)
    ann an linn cogadh nan conin the distant past (literally, “in the era of the war of the dogs”)

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin cum (with), from Proto-Italic *kom, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm (next to, at, with, along).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /kon/ [kõn]
  • Audio:(file)
  • Rhymes: -on
  • Syllabification: con

Preposition edit

con

  1. with
    Antonym: sin
  2. on
    Yo cuento con ustedes.I count on you.

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Further reading edit

Vietnamese edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Vietic *kɔːn, from Proto-Mon-Khmer *kuun ~ *kuən. Cognate with Muong còn, Thavung กอน, Mon ကွေန် (kon), Khmer កូន (koun), Bahnar kon, Khasi khun, Central Nicobarese kōan. For semantic relations, compare Chinese (child; small thing; son), Japanese (shi, ko, child; small thing; son; boy; girl). See also non (young, juvenile), which is from an infixed form of the root.

Attested in the Annan Jishi (安南即事, 13th century) as (MC kan).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

(classifier đứa) con (𡥵, )

  1. a child (daughter or son)
    con cáichildren
    con nuôian adopted child
    gà cona chick
    Con cóc con là con con cóc.
    A toadlet is an offspring of a toad.
    • 1983, Homer, translated by Phan Thị Miến, Ô-đi-xê [The Odyssey]:
      Tê-lê-mác, con ! Đừng làm rầy mẹ, mẹ còn muốn thử thách cha ở tại nhà này. Thế nào rồi mẹ con cũng sẽ nhận ra, chắc chắn như vậy. Hiện giờ cha còn bẩn thỉu, áo quần rách rưới, nên mẹ con khinh cha, chưa nói : “Đích thị là chàng rồi !”. […]
      Telemachus, my son! Don’t you bother your mother, she still wants to put me to trials at this home. She will recognize me eventually, there is no doubt about that. I still look like a rascal, in torn clothes, that is why your mother still doubts me, she is yet to say: “It was definitely you this whole time!”. […]
  2. (rare, chiefly in translations of ancient texts) a son
    Antonym: con gái
  3. (only in compounds, in fixed expressions) build; stature

Derived terms edit

Noun edit

con (𡥵, )

  1. (rare, only in compounds) a small thing
    con quaya spinning top
    con lắca pendulum

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Pronoun edit

con (𡥵, )

  1. I/me (used by children when talking to their parents)
  2. (chiefly Central Vietnam and Southern Vietnam) I/me (used when talking to someone significantly older than the speaker)
  3. you (used by parents when talking to their children)
  4. (chiefly Central Vietnam and Southern Vietnam) you (used when talking to some significantly younger than the speaker)
    con thật!
    It's you for real!

Usage notes edit

  • Sense (4) is chiefly used in Central and Southern Vietnam, perhaps extensively to North Central Vietnam. In Northern Vietnam, cháu is used instead. Some Northerners, however, do use con, especially when talking to Southern children on Southern TV shows.

Synonyms edit

Classifier edit

con

  1. Indicates animals (including humans).
  2. (disrespectful) Indicates female people.
    Antonym: thằng
    một thằng, hai conone guy, two girls
  3. Indicates knives, ships, boats, trains and eye pupils.
    con daoa knife
  4. Indicates roads, rivers, streams and waves.
    trên con đường đến hạnh phúcon the road/path to happiness
  5. (somewhat literary) Indicates written characters.
    con chữa character or letter
  6. (colloquial) Indicates wheeled vehicles.
    Anh mày có hẳn hai con xe Honda đấy nhớ!
    I have two Honda motorbikes!
  7. (colloquial) Indicates video games and movies.
    Ông chơi con game này chưa?
    Have you played this game?

Usage notes edit

  • Even though con người is used, it is generally thought of as a noun phrase on its own, and người does not require a classifier because it is itself a classifier (compare Japanese (nin)). Một con người "a person" does not sound dehumanizing, but even literary, while một người sounds casual enough.
  • The phrase con người is popularly employed as a philosophical trope or device to bring up discussions about what it means to be human as opposed to being an animal, even though it is not really semantically convincing given the fact that humans are, zoologically, animals, and there are non-animal things going with this classifier.

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Zazaki edit

Etymology edit

Related to Persian جان (jân).

Noun edit

con

  1. soul