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EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin patriarcha, from Byzantine Greek πατριάρχης (patriárkhēs, the founder of the tribe/family), from Ancient Greek πατριά (patriá, generation, ancestry, descent, tribe, family) + -αρχης (-arkhēs, -arch).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

patriarca m (plural patriarques)

  1. patriarch

Related termsEdit


ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin patriarcha, from Byzantine Greek πατριάρχης (patriárkhēs, the founder of the tribe/family), from Ancient Greek πατριά (patriá, generation, ancestry, descent, tribe, family) + -αρχης (-arkhēs, -arch).

NounEdit

patriarca m (plural patriarchi)

  1. patriarch

Related termsEdit


PortugueseEdit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese patriarca, patriarcha, borrowed from Late Latin patriarcha, from Byzantine Greek πατριάρχης (patriárkhēs, the founder of the tribe/family), from Ancient Greek πατριά (patriá, generation, ancestry, descent, tribe, family) + -αρχης (-arkhēs, -arch).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

patriarca m (plural patriarcas)

  1. (sociology) patriarch (male head of a community or household)
  2. (ecclesiastical, chiefly Eastern Orthodoxy and Eastern Catholicism) patriarch (highest rank of bishop)

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin patriarcha, from Byzantine Greek πατριάρχης (patriárkhēs, the founder of the tribe/family), from Ancient Greek πατριά (patriá, generation, ancestry, descent, tribe, family) + -αρχης (-arkhēs, -arch).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /paˈtɾjarka/, [paˈt̪ɾjarka]

NounEdit

patriarca m (plural patriarcas)

  1. patriarch

Related termsEdit