peculium

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin peculium. See peculiar.

NounEdit

peculium (plural peculia)

  1. (law, historical) The savings of a son or a slave, with the father's or master's consent; a little property or stock of one's own.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Burrill to this entry?)
  2. A special fund for private and personal uses.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for peculium in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From pecū.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pecūlium n (genitive pecūliī or pecūlī); second declension

  1. private property (originally in the form of cattle, but later in the form of savings)

Usage notesEdit

Often used in Ancient Rome to refer to the payment a teaching slave would occasionally collect from his students.

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative pecūlium pecūlia
Genitive pecūliī
pecūlī1
pecūliōrum
Dative pecūliō pecūliīs
Accusative pecūlium pecūlia
Ablative pecūliō pecūliīs
Vocative pecūlium pecūlia

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Aromanian: piculj, piculjiu
  • Catalan: peculi
  • French: pécule
  • Italian: peculio

ReferencesEdit