consent

EnglishEdit

 consent on Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Recorded in Middle English since circa 1225, borrowed from Old French consentir, from Latin cōnsentīre, present active infinitive of cōnsentiō (to feel together), itself from com- (with) + sentiō (to feel)

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kənˈsɛnt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt
  • Hyphenation: con‧sent
  • (file)

VerbEdit

consent (third-person singular simple present consents, present participle consenting, simple past and past participle consented) (intransitive)

  1. To express willingness, to give permission.
    After reflecting a little bit, I've decided to consent.
  2. (medicine) To cause to sign a consent form.
    • 2002, T Usmani; KD O'Brien, HV Worthington, S Derwent, et al, “A randomized clinical trial to compare the effectiveness of canine lacebacks with reference to …”, in Journal of Orthodontics:
      When the patient was consented to enter the study and registered, a telephone call was made to research assistant
  3. (obsolete) To grant; to allow; to assent to.
  4. To agree in opinion or sentiment; to be of the same mind; to accord; to concur.

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NounEdit

consent (countable and uncountable, plural consents)

  1. Voluntary agreement or permission.
  2. (obsolete) Unity or agreement of opinion, sentiment, or inclination.
  3. (obsolete) Advice; counsel.

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Further readingEdit

  • consent at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • consent in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

consent

  1. third-person singular present indicative of consentir