See also: PICNIC and pícnic

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French pique-nique.

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: pĭkʹ-nĭk, IPA(key): /ˈpɪknɪk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪknɪk
  • Hyphenation: pic‧nic

NounEdit

picnic (plural picnics)

  1. An informal social gathering, usually in a natural outdoor setting, to which the participants bring their own food and drink.
    We went out for a picnic in the forest.
  2. The meal eaten at such a gathering.
  3. (figuratively) An easy or pleasant task.
    Synonym: piece of cake
    We remind the guests that dealing with this problem is no picnic, and to be patient.
    • 1936, Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind:
      "Don't put your hand on me," said Uncle Henry irritably. "I'm crawling with lice. War would be a picnic if it wasn't for lice and dysentery. []
  4. (obsolete) An entertainment at which each person contributed some dish to a common table.
  5. A cut of pork from the shoulder area (above the front leg) of a pig.
    • 1923, The National Provisioner, page 50:
      Smoked picnics of medium weights - from 6 to 8 pounds - are selling at wholesale at present for about half the price of fancy hams. Standard bacon of medium weights is another smoked product that is selling []
    • 1940, War Department Technical Manual, page 53:
      Smoked picnics (calas) are pork shoulders with the butt portion removed just beyond the knuckle bone. Shoulder butts are boneless  []
    • 2001, Good Housekeeping, The Good Housekeeping Illustrated Cookbook, Hearst Books (→ISBN), page 218:
      Smoked picnics are sold whole and usually fully cooked. When sold boneless they are called pork shoulder roll.
      COOKING HAMS AND PICNICS
      Roasting : Roast a fully cooked ham or picnic according to []

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Japanese: ピクニック (pikunikku)

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

picnic (third-person singular simple present picnics, present participle picnicking, simple past and past participle picnicked)

  1. To take part in a picnic.
    • 2000, Bill Oddie, Gripping Yarns, page 71:
      And I'll never forget the chillingly instinctive racism. "Sure is pretty countryside. Pity it's spoiled by the niggers picknickin."

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English picnic, from French pique-nique.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

picnic m (invariable)

  1. picnic (outdoor meal)

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French pique-nique.

NounEdit

picnic n (plural picnicuri)

  1. picnic

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English picnic, from French pique-nique.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpiɡnik/, [ˈpiɣ̞.nik]

NounEdit

picnic m (plural picnics)

  1. Misspelling of pícnic.