Open main menu

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

pile +‎ -er

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

piler (plural pilers)

  1. One who piles something
    • 2007 May 10, Penelope Green, “Order and Chaos in a Single Heartbeat”, in New York Times[1]:
      Houses and photography sets seem to work better, he said, if “I exert a system of precision.” Ms. Ford, 33, said she is by nature a piler and stacker but has learned to follow what she described good-naturedly as “the Charlie Code.”

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin pīlō, pīlāre (to ram down), from pīla (column).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

piler

  1. (transitive, cooking) to crush
  2. (intransitive) to slam on the brakes of a vehicle, making it come to a sudden stop.

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

piler m, f

  1. indefinite plural of pil

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

piler f, m

  1. indefinite feminine plural of pil

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *pilāre, from Latin pila.

NounEdit

piler m (oblique plural pilers, nominative singular pilers, nominative plural piler)

  1. pillar

DescendantsEdit