Last modified on 24 April 2014, at 20:29

pop off

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

pop off (third-person singular simple present pops off, present participle popping off, simple past and past participle popped off)

  1. (intransitive, informal) To leave, and return in a short time
    I'm just popping off to the shops to pick up some bread.
  2. (intransitive, informal) To die suddenly.
  3. (transitive, informal) To kill someone.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 35
      When Captain Sleet in person stood his mast-head in this crow’s-nest of his, he tells us that he always had a rifle with him (also fixed in the rack), together with a powder flask and shot, for the purpose of popping off the stray narwhales, or vagrant sea unicorns infesting those waters; for you cannot successfully shoot at them from the deck owing to the resistance of the water, but to shoot down upon them is a very different thing.
  4. (intransitive, informal) To speak frankly; usually to someone else's disdain (i.e. popping off at the mouth).
  5. (intransitive, informal) To release flatulence, in most cases, in short rapid succession.
  6. To thrust away, or put off promptly.
    to pop one off with a denial
    (Can we find and add a quotation of John Locke to this entry?)