See also: of, -off, off., off-, and Off.

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English of, from Old English of, af, æf (from, off, away), from Proto-Germanic *ab (from), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂epo (from, off, back). Cognate with Scots of, af (off, away), West Frisian af, ôf (off, away), Dutch af (off, from), German Low German of (off, from), German ab (off, from), Danish af (of, off), Norwegian Bokmål, Norwegian Nynorsk and Swedish av (of, off), Icelandic af (of, off), Gothic 𐌰𐍆 (af, of, from); and with Latin ab (of, from, by), Ancient Greek ἀπό (apó, from), and others. Doublet of of.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

off (not comparable)

  1. In a direction away from the speaker or object.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 4, in The Celebrity:
      No matter how early I came down, I would find him on the veranda, smoking cigarettes, or [] . And at last I began to realize in my harassed soul that all elusion was futile, and to take such holidays as I could get, when he was off with a girl, in a spirit of thankfulness.
    • 1908, W[illiam] B[lair] M[orton] Ferguson, chapter IV, in Zollenstein, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 731476803:
      So this was my future home, I thought! [] Backed by towering hills, the but faintly discernible purple line of the French boundary off to the southwest, a sky of palest Gobelin flecked with fat, fleecy little clouds, it in truth looked a dear little city; the city of one's dreams.
    He drove off in a cloud of smoke.
  2. Into a state of non-operation; into a state of non-existence.
    Please switch off the light when you leave.
    die off
  3. So as to remove or separate, or be removed or separated.
    He bit off the end of the carrot.
    Some branches were sawn off.
  4. Used in various other ways specific to individual idiomatic phrases, e.g. bring off, show off, put off, tell off, etc. See the entry for the individual phrase.

Usage notesEdit

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Terms derived from off (adverb)

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AdjectiveEdit

off (comparative more off, superlative most off)

  1. Inoperative, disabled.
    Antonym: on
    All the lights are off.
  2. Cancelled; not happening.
    The party's off because the hostess is sick.
  3. Rancid, rotten.
    Antonym: fresh
    This milk is off!
  4. Less than normal, in temperament or in result.
    sales are off this quarter
  5. Inappropriate; untoward.
    I felt that his comments were a bit off.
  6. (in phrases such as 'well off', 'better off', 'poorly off') Circumstanced.
    • 2008, Kiron K. Skinner; Bruce Bueno de Mesquita, Serhiy Kudelia, The Strategy of Campaigning:
      'Are you better off now than you were four years ago?' With that pointed question, Ronald Reagan defined the 1980 presidential election as a 92 referendum on Jimmy Carter's economic policies
  7. Started on the way.
    off to see the wizard
    And they're off! Whatsmyname takes an early lead, with Remember The Mane behind by a nose.
    • 1990, Peter Pinney, The glass cannon: a Bougainville diary, 1944-45:
      Let them glimpse a green man coming at them with intent, and they're off like a bride's nighty. Even after capture some of them will seize every attempt to suicide — they just can't live with the tremendous loss of face.
  8. Far; off to the side.
    He took me down the corridor and into an off room.
    the off horse or ox in a team, in distinction from the nigh or near horse
    • 1937, Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God, Harper Perennial (2000), p.151:
      He came in, took a look and squinched down into a chair in an off corner and didn’t open his mouth.
  9. Designating a time when one is not strictly attentive to business or affairs, or is absent from a post, and, hence, a time when affairs are not urgent.
    He took an off day for fishing.  an off year in politics; the off season
  10. (in phrases such as 'off day') Designating a time when one is not performing to the best of one's abilities.
  11. (of a dish on a menu) Presently unavailable.
    I'll have the chicken please.
    Sorry, chicken's off today.
  12. (Britain, in relation to a vehicle) On the side furthest from the kerb (the right-hand side if one drives on the left).
    • 1963, Jack Schaefer: Monte Walsh, page 174:
      The man and the horse came closer and were Sonny Jacobs of the Diamond Six and a smallish neat sorrel definitely favouring its off forefoot.
    The off front wheel came loose.
    Antonym: near
  13. (cricket) In, or towards the half of the field away from the batsman's legs; the right side for a right-handed batsman.
    Antonyms: on, leg

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

PrepositionEdit

off

  1. Not positioned upon; away from a position upon.
    He's off the roof now.
    I took it off the table.
    Keep off the grass.
  2. Detached, separated, excluded or disconnected from; away from a position of attachment or connection to.
    The phone is off the hook
    The coat fell off the peg.
    He was thrown off the team for cheating.
    We've been off the grid for three days now.
    We're off their radar.
    He's off the computer, but he's still on the phone.
  3. Used to indicate the location or direction of one thing relative to another, implying adjacency or accessibility via.
    His office is off this corridor on the right.
    We're just off the main road.
    Look! There's a UFO off our left wing!
  4. Used to express location at sea relative to land or mainland.
    The island is 23 miles off the cape.
  5. Removed or subtracted from.
    There's 20% off the list price.
  6. No longer wanting or taking.
    He's been off his feed since Tuesday.
    He's off his meds again.
  7. (colloquial, more properly 'from') Out of the possession of.
    He didn't buy it off him. He stole it off him.
  8. Placed after a number (of products or parts, as if a unit), in commerce or engineering.
    Tantalum bar 6 off 3/8" Dia × 12" — Atom, Great Britain Atomic Energy Authority, 1972
    samples submitted … 12 off Thermistors type 1K3A531 … — BSI test report for shock and vibration testing, 2000
    I'd like to re-order those printer cartridges, let's say 5-off.

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

off (third-person singular simple present offs, present participle offing, simple past and past participle offed)

  1. (transitive, slang) To kill.
    He got in the way so I had him offed.
    • 2017 September 19, Gwilym Mumford, “Kingsman: The Golden Circle review – spy sequel reaches new heights of skyscraping silliness”, in the Guardian[1]:
      Most sorely missed is the relationship between Eggsy and Colin Firth’s delightfully avuncular mentor figure Harry Hart, who was offed, seemingly definitively with a bullet to the brain towards its end.
  2. (transitive, Singapore, Philippines) To switch off.
    Can you off the light?

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

off (uncountable)

  1. (usually in phrases such as 'from the off', 'at the off', etc.) Beginning; starting point.
    He has been very obviously an untrustworthy narrator right from the off.

Further readingEdit

  • off at OneLook Dictionary Search

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


Central FranconianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • ov (alternative spelling)
  • ob (western Moselle Franconian; otherwise as a variant, but only in the sense of “if”)

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German of, *ova, northern variant of oba.

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

off

  1. (most dialects) if; whether
    Ich weeß net, off dat stemmp.
    I don’t know if that’s true.
  2. (Ripuarian) or
    Dat mösse foffzig off sechsig Mann jewäs senn.
    They must’ve been fifty or sixty people.
    Donnersdaach off Friedaach moss ich nohm Finanzamp.
    I need to go to the tax office Thursday or Friday.

Usage notesEdit

  • Though formerly generally applicable, the Ripuarian off (“or”) is now used only in vague statements or estimates. The word odder is used in order to express an actual alternative.

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

AdjectiveEdit

off (invariable)

  1. off-screen
  2. (theater) off-Broadway; minor-league; small-time

Derived termsEdit