potestas

Contents

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From possum / potis + -tās.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

potestās f ‎(genitive potestātis); third declension

  1. power, ability
  2. mastery, control
  3. authority, jurisdiction
  4. dominion, political power
  5. right, legal power
  6. (of a word) meaning
  7. possibility, opportunity

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative potestās potestātēs
genitive potestātis potestātum
dative potestātī potestātibus
accusative potestātem potestātēs
ablative potestāte potestātibus
vocative potestās potestātēs

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • potestas” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
  • potestas” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • power over life and death: potestas vitae necisque
    • to be in a person's power: in manu, in potestate alicuius situm, positum esse
    • to give a man the opportunity of doing a thing: potestatem, copiam alicui dare, facere with Gen. gerund.
    • to deprive a man of the chance of doing a thing: facultatem, potestatem alicui eripere, adimere
    • to give audience to some one: sui potestatem facere, praebere alicui
    • despotic, tyrannous rule: potestas immoderata, infinita
    • to give up, lay down office (usually at the end of one's term of office): de potestate decedere
    • he has power over life and death: potestatem habet in aliquem vitae necisque (B. G. 1. 16. 5)
    • to give up one's person and all one's possessions to the conqueror: se suaque omnia permittere victoris potestati
    • to surrender oneself to the discretion of some one: se permittere in fidem atque in potestatem alicuius (B. G. 2. 3)
    • to offer battle to the enemy: potestatem, copiam pugnandi hostibus facere
    • to accept battle: potestatem sui facere (alicui) (cf. sect. XII. 9, note audientia...)
    • to reduce a country to subjection to oneself: populum in potestatem suam redigere (B. G. 2. 34)
    • to make oneself master of a people, country: populum, terram suo imperio, suae potestati subicere (not sibi by itself)
    • to make one's submission to some one: in alicuius potestatem se permittere
    • to be subject to some one, under some one's dominion: in potestate, in dicione alicuius esse
  • potestas” in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
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