See also: Pre-U

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a variant of Old Occitan pretz, from Latin pretium, from Proto-Indo-European *preti- (back).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

preu m (plural preus)

  1. price

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Shortened from premier.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

preu m (plural preux)

  1. The first.
    • 1870, Denis Poulot, Le Sublime, page 88:
      Il n'y a pas de danger qu'on le renvoie, lui le preu des tourneurs de la capitale.
      There's no danger that he will be sent back, he being the first of the tourneurs of the capital.
    • 1879, Jules Vallès, L’Enfant, page 274:
      Il était le premier en dissertation, mon père n'était que le second, mais mon père redevenait le preu en vers latins.
      He was first place in essay-writing, my father was only second place, but my father become the first again in Latin poetry.
  2. (dated, schoolchild slang) The first to play (in a game).
  3. The second floor (of a building).
    • (Can we date this quote?) H. Monnier, Scènes populaires, quoted in Rigaud, Dictionnaire d'argot moderne, page 313:
      Tiens! v'là l'bijoutier du no10 qui n's'embête pas, lui; il vous a loué tout son preu.
      Look! There, the jeweler at number 10 isn't annoyed; he leased to you his whole second floor.

Further readingEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin prōde. Doublet of pro, after specialization in the context of battle.

AdjectiveEdit

preu

  1. brave; valiant, chivalrous

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • French: preux (from the oblique plural preux, preuz)