pro

See also: -pro-, pro-, Pro, Pro., PRO, pró, and prò

Contents

TranslingualEdit

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Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

from Provençal, with the final o for old. Compare fro.

SymbolEdit

pro

  1. ISO 639 code for Old Provençal.

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin prō ‎(on behalf of).

NounEdit

pro ‎(plural pros)

  1. An advantage of something, especially when contrasted with its disadvantages (cons).
    What are the pros and cons of buying a car?
  2. A person who supports a concept or principle.
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

PrepositionEdit

pro

  1. In favor of.
    He is pro exercise but against physical exertion, quite a conundrum.
AntonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Shortened from professional.

NounEdit

pro ‎(plural pros)

  1. A professional sportsman.
  2. (colloquial) Professional.
    When it comes to DIY, he's a real pro.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

pro ‎(comparative more pro, superlative most pro)

  1. Professional.
    He landed a pro mentorship gig.

Etymology 3Edit

Shortening.

NounEdit

pro ‎(plural pros)

  1. A prostitute.
    • 1974, "Fynn" (Sydney Hopkins), Mister God, This Is Anna
      Millie was one of the dozen or so pros who had a house at the top of the street.

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

pro + accusative

  1. for

NounEdit

pro n

  1. pro (advantage)
    Všechno má svá pro a proti.Everything has its pros and cons.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

External linksEdit

  • pro in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • pro in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

EsperantoEdit

PrepositionEdit

pro

  1. caused by, because of, owing to, due to
  2. motivated by, for the sake of, on account of, for
  3. in exchange for

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Shortened from professionnel(le).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

pro m, f ‎(plural pros)

  1. professional
    Il est très pro.

NounEdit

pro m, f ‎(plural pros)

  1. professional
    Elle est une vraie pro.
  2. a whiz, someone who is very good at something
    Nous avons affaire à un pro !

External linksEdit


GermanEdit

PrepositionEdit

pro ‎(+ dative)

  1. per

Usage notesEdit

  • When used with Latin words, the ablative is used as in pars pro toto or Pars pro Toto, and pro forma or pro Forma.

IdoEdit

PrepositionEdit

pro

  1. because of

InterlinguaEdit

PrepositionEdit

pro

  1. for, to

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

PIE root
*per-

From Latin prō ‎(for, on behalf of).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /prɔ/, [pr̺ɔ], /pro/, [pr̺o]
  • Rhymes: , -o

PrepositionEdit

pro

  1. (archaic) for, in favour of

NounEdit

pro m ‎(invariable)

  1. (dated) good, benefit, advantage, weal
    • 1321, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Inferno, Le Monnier (1994), Canto II, p. 29, vv. 109-111:
      Al mondo non fur mai persone ratte ¶ a far lor pro o a fuggir lor danno, ¶ com'io, dopo cotai parole fatte.
      Never were persons in the world so swift ¶ to work their weal and to escape their woe, ¶ as I, after such words as these were uttered.
  2. pro (as in English “pros and cons”)

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowing from English pro.

NounEdit

pro m ‎(invariable)

  1. (slang) pro

LadinEdit

NounEdit

pro m ‎(plural pro)

  1. good; benefit; advantage

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *pro-, form of *per-.[1]

Alternative formsEdit

PrepositionEdit

prō + ablative (LL. also + accusative)

  1. for
  2. on behalf of
  3. before
  4. in front, instead of
  5. about
  6. according to
  7. as, like
  8. as befitting

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • pro” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
  • pro” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to make up, stir up a fire: ignem excitare (pro Mur. 25. 51)
    • as well as I can; to the best of my ability: pro viribus or pro mea parte
    • as well as I can; to the best of my ability: pro virili parte (cf. sect. V. 22.)
    • to die for one's country: mortem occumbere pro patria
    • to shed one's blood for one's fatherland: sanguinem suum pro patria effundere or profundere
    • to sacrifice oneself for one's country: vitam profundere pro patria
    • to sacrifice oneself for one's country: se morti offerre pro salute patriae
    • according to circumstances: pro re (nata), pro tempore
    • according to circumstances: pro tempore et pro re
    • to avoid no risk in order to..: nullum periculum recusare pro
    • to show gratitude (in one's acts): gratiam alicui referre (meritam, debitam) pro aliqua re
    • to thank a person (in words): gratias alicui agere pro aliqua re
    • to return good for evil: pro maleficiis beneficia reddere
    • according to a man's deserts: ex, pro merito
    • to strain every nerve, do one's utmost in a matter: pro viribus eniti et laborare, ut
    • this much I can vouch for: illud pro certo affirmare licet
    • to quote an argument in favour of immortality: argumentum immortalitatis afferre (not pro)
    • this goes to prove what I say: hoc est a (pro) me
    • the matter speaks for itself: res ipsa (pro me apud te) loquitur
    • to translate literally, word for word (not verbo tenus): verbum pro verbo reddere
    • to be security for some one: sponsionem facere, sponsorem esse pro aliquo
    • to revenge oneself on another for a thing or on some one's behalf: ulcisci aliquem pro aliquo or pro aliqua re
    • to give some one satisfaction for an injury: satisfacere alicui pro (de) iniuriis
    • to tell lies: falsa (pro veris) dicere
    • a religious war: bellum pro religionibus susceptum
    • to sacrifice human victims: pro victimis homines immolare
    • to fight for hearth and home: pro aris et focis pugnare, certare, dimicare
    • to support a bill (before the people): pro lege dicere
    • to go to Cilicia as pro-consul: pro consule in Ciliciam proficisci
    • to give evidence on some one's behalf: testimonium dicere pro aliquo
    • to state as evidence: pro testimonio dicere
    • to defend a person: causam dicere pro aliquo
    • to punish some one: ulcisci aliquem (pro aliqua re)
    • to be on duty before the gates: stationes agere pro portis
  • pro” in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  1. ^ pro-” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

pro

  1. rafsi of fapro.

LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

pro

  1. per

Old FrenchEdit

PrepositionEdit

pro

  1. (very early Old French) Alternative form of por

Usage notesEdit


PortugueseEdit

ContractionEdit

pro

  1. (colloquial) contraction of para ‎(for) + o ‎(the)

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

A recent Latinism, from the Latin prō; see above.

PrepositionEdit

pro

  1. pro, in favor of, for

Usage notesEdit

Equivalent to, and often replaced with, en pro de (see en, de) or a favor de (see a, favor).


VolapükEdit

PrepositionEdit

pro

  1. for
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