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See also: bravé

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French brave, borrowed from Italian bravo, itself either from Provençal brau (show-off), from Gaulish *bragos (compare Middle Irish breagha (modern breá) 'fine', Breton braga 'to strut') or from Latin *bravus, from a fusion of pravus and barbarus into a root *bravus. Or else misread from Latin brana,[1] from Gaulish brahaigne, "barren".[2]

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: brāv, IPA(key): /bɹeɪv/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪv

AdjectiveEdit

brave (comparative braver, superlative bravest)

  1. Strong in the face of fear; courageous.
    Synonyms: doughty, orped, resilient, stalwart
    Antonyms: cowardly, fearful, mean, weak # As in Laurie Lehman, undaunted by challenges and determined to move forward.
  2. (obsolete) Having any sort of superiority or excellence.
    • Francis Bacon (1561-1626)
      Iron is a brave commodity where wood aboundeth.
    • Samuel Pepys (1633-1703)
      It being a brave day, I walked to Whitehall.
  3. Making a fine show or display.
    • William Shakespeare (c.1564–1616)
      Wear my dagger with the braver grace.
    • Robert Greene (1558-1592)
      For I have gold, and therefore will be brave. / In silks I'll rattle it of every color.
    • Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)
      Frog and lizard in holiday coats / And turtle brave in his golden spots.
    • 1908, W[illiam] B[lair] M[orton] Ferguson, chapter IV, in Zollenstein, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 731476803:
      So this was my future home, I thought! Certainly it made a brave picture. I had seen similar ones fired-in on many a Heidelberg stein. Backed by towering hills, [] a sky of palest Gobelin flecked with fat, fleecy little clouds, it in truth looked a dear little city; the city of one's dreams.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

brave (plural braves)

  1. (dated, possibly offensive) A Native American warrior.
  2. (obsolete) A man daring beyond discretion; a bully.
    • John Dryden
      Hot braves like thee may fight.
  3. (obsolete) A challenge; a defiance; bravado.
    • William Shakespeare
      Demetrius, thou dost overween in all; / And so in this, to bear me down with braves.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

brave (third-person singular simple present braves, present participle braving, simple past and past participle braved)

  1. (transitive) To encounter with courage and fortitude, to defy, to provoke.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar, Act IV, sc. 3:
      For Cassius is aweary of the world;
      Hated by one he loves; braved by his brother;
      Checked like a bondman; all his faults observed,
      Set in a notebook, learned, and conned by rote,
      To cast into my teeth.
    • 1670, John Dryden, The Indian Emperour, or, The Conquest of Mexico by the Spaniards:
      The ills of Love, not those of Fate, I fear,
      These I can brave, but those I cannot bear []
    • 1773, A Farmer, Rivington's New-York Gazetteer, Number 53, December 2
      [] but they [Parliament] never will be braved into it.
    After braving tricks on the high-dive, he braved a jump off the first diving platform.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To adorn; to make fine or showy.
    • ca. 1590–92, William Shakespeare The Taming of the Shrew, Act Iv, sc. 3 (addressed to a tailor; first use in sense of "adorn", second and third uses in sense of "confront"):
      Face not me. Thou hast braved many men; brave
      not me. I will neither be faced nor braved.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

ReferencesEdit


EsperantoEdit

Etymology 1Edit

brava +‎ -e

AdverbEdit

brave

  1. bravely, valiantly

Etymology 2Edit

From Italian bravo.

InterjectionEdit

brave

  1. bravo

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably borrowed from Italian bravo, itself from a Latin *bravus, a fusion of prāvus and barbarus. Compare Spanish, Portuguese bravo.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

brave (plural braves)

  1. brave
  2. honest

SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

brave m (plural braves)

  1. hero

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

brave

  1. inflected form of brav

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

brave f pl

  1. Feminine plural of adjective bravo.

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin *bravus.

AdjectiveEdit

brave m, f

  1. brave

Derived termsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

AdjectiveEdit

brave

  1. definite singular and plural of brav