proprium

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

proprium

  1. (theology) selfhood
    • 1758, Emanuel Swedenborg, The New Jerusalem and Its Heavenly Doctrine
      Man of himself, so far as he is under the influence of his proprium, is worse than the brutes. If man should be led by his own proprium, he could not possibly be saved.

CzechEdit

NounEdit

proprium n

  1. proper noun

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • proprium in Kartotéka Novočeského lexikálního archivu
  • proprium in Akademický slovník cizích slov, 1995, at prirucka.ujc.cas.cz

DanishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Latin (nōmen) proprium, neuter of proprius (own, individual).

NounEdit

proprium n (singular definite propriet, plural indefinite proprier)

  1. (grammar) proper noun (the name of a particular person, place, organization or other individual entity)

InflectionEdit

SynonymsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

prōprium

  1. nominative neuter singular of prōprius

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

proprium n (definite singular propriet, indefinite plural proprier, definite plural propria or propriene)

  1. (grammar) proper noun
  2. (Christianity) part of mass which is particular to the date or situation
    Coordinate term: ordinarium

Norwegian NynorskEdit

NounEdit

proprium n (definite singular propriet, indefinite plural proprium, definite plural propria)

  1. (grammar) proper noun
  2. (Christianity) part of mass which is particular to the date or situation
    Coordinate term: ordinarium